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THE PILGRIM 

Volume XVI Plymouth, Mass., June, 1937 No. 1 

Published this year as a Senior Year Book 

1936 THE PILGRIM STAFF 1937 

Editor-in-Chief ----------------- Mary Bodell 

Assistant Editor-in Chief ------------- AUDREY DUTTON 

Literary Editor ---------------- Phyllis Johnson 

Assistant Literary Editor ----------- Jeannette Hatton 

Business Manager ----------------- Alan Hey 

Assistant Business Manager ------------ Francis Scheid 

Boys' Athletics ----------------- Edward Tong 

Girls' Athletics ---------------- i Cynthia Drew 

Lriris Atmetics j Mary Weild 

Art --------------------- Douglas Tubbs 

Exchange Editor ----------------- Leo Roberge 

Assistant Exchange Editor ------------ Brooks Barnes 

French Editor ------------------ Annie Paoli 

Latin Editor ------------------ Marion Pratt 

Alumni Editor - - - - _--..--_ Mary Curtin 

Toke Editors -I NORMAN JONES 

joke Editors | Francis Fabri 

School News Editor John Ryan 

Feature Editor Mary Brigida 



Table of Contents 



COMMENCEMENT PAGE 

History of the Class of 1937 3 

Last Will and Testament - 5 

Rogues' Gallery 5 

Class Prophecy -17 

A Student's Idea of a Faculty Meeting 20 



Ambitions 



L 



7 



Senior Baby Pictures 23 

Up and Down the Corridors 24 

From Song and Story 24 

Principal's Column 25 

Class Poem 26 

LITERATURE 

Hurrah! A Holiday! -. . -27 

A Woodland Retreat 2" 

Junior Poetry Page 28 

"What Luck, Uncle?" 29 

Learning to Skate 30 

Class Song 30 

Cemetery in Late Autumn 30 

Woods in Winter Moonlight 30 

Junior Viewpoints 32 

The Sleepless Night -..33 

Sophomore Poetry Page 34 

The Twenty-third Psalm of English 3 5 

The Sun 35 

Pilgrim Life 36 

ACTIVITIES 37 

EXCHANGES 39 

Teachers' Baby Pictures 40 

Alumni Notes - - - - -. 41 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 44 

ATHLETICS 47 

To Winter 50 



Class of 1937 
of 

Plymouth Hi^h School 

OFFICERS 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



LeBaron Briggs 

Robert Sampson 

Audrey Dutton 

Mary Brigida 



CLASS COLORS 
Green and White 

CLASS MOTTO 
Altiora Petamus 

CLASS FLOWER 
Yellow Rose 



History of the Class of 1937 



& INCE I have heard it charged that 
^ class historians are rather more sus- 
ceptible than most human beings to a 
lack of perspective and a fondess for 
hyperbole, and since it is furthermore 
charged that the true purpose of their 
literary endeavors is therefore thwarted 
and their real value to posterity im- 
paired, I wish to make it clear at the 
outset that the historian of the Class of 
1937 may not satisfactorily be indicted 
on these counts. I intend to vindicate the 
maligned authors of class chronicles by 
submitting a work devoid of hyperbole 
and characterized by precision, let the 
words of praise and blame fall where 
they may. 

I 

The Class of 1937 entered High School 
with a rather bewildered air, for its 
members were the first to make the 
transition between grades eight and nine 
without the colorful pageant which for 
many years had terminated Junior High 
School days. The decision of the School 
Committee to dispense with a formal 
graduation from Junior High School 
was apparently made to impress upon 
us the fact that we had achieved 
no extraordinary goal in the field of ed- 
ucation by completing eight grades — 
and with this point of view, after a pass- 
ing of time, we most readily concur. 

Our air of bewilderment was soon re- 



placed by another of a somewhat pugna- 
cious nature, for we were fighting, as 
other classes had done before us, to pre- 
serve ourselves from the belittling acts 
of upper-classmen and to thwart the 
rising interest of Senior boys in Fresh- 
man girls — an interest so general that 
we must conclude that the feminine 
element in the Class of 1937 must have 
possessed an unusual amount of charm, 
even as freshmen. 

As a result of elections, we were led 
by: 

President Richard Keough 

Vice-President Antone Medeiros 

Secretary John Maccaferri 

The gala occasion of the year was the 
Freshman Dance, the evening when our 
young souls soared high. 

The Student Activities Society was 
organized in this year, and we became 
the first class to have representatives in 
this society through the entirety of our 
High School career. 

II 
The Sophomore year began with even 
less ceremony than the first. At this 
point we demonstrated our courage to 
break with custom, for we elected a 
girl as class president. This honor fell 
to Lois Brewster, while John Maccaferri 
served as vice-president, Mary Curtin 
as secretary, and Robert Sampson as 
treasurer. 



THE PILGRIM 



During this year "Pinafore", an 
operetta by Gilbert and Sullivan, was 
produced, and one of our own Sopho- 
more girls, Ruth Butts, was chosen to 
play a leading part, that of the captain's 
daughter. Others of our class were in 
the chorus. 

Moreover, many of our number can 
boast of having participated in the im- 
pressive Christmas assembly in charge 
of Miss Garey and her French students. 

Although it constituted a grave dis- 
appointment to a large number, we held 
no Sophomore Hop. We have heard it 
intimated that this was due to our own 
procrastination, but it could as easily be 
explained by the fact that the two 
classes above us possessed an overdevel- 
oped readiness to seize for themselves all 
available dates. 

Ill 

As Juniors we were guided in our ac- 
tivities by the following: 
President William Clark 

Vice-President John Maccaferri 

Secretary Alice Wood 

Treasurer Mary Brigida 

In this year the School Circus was 
held for the first time with one of our 
classmates, LeBaron Briggs, as Master 
of Ceremonies. 

Our Junior Promenade, which was 
hailed with the customary enthusiasm, 
was both a social and financial success. 
In connection with this event we proved 
to ourselves and to others that overhead 
decorations were not impossible in 
Memorial Hall by our novel display of 
basket-woven streamers. 

The last day of our third year must 
have been utterly unlike that experi- 
enced by any other Junior Class, for 
we were bidding the "Old P. H. S." a 
fond farewell. The occasion evoked 
memories, for the most part plaasant, 
memories such as are ordinarily per- 
mitted only to a graduating class. 

IV 
JV NEW High School — the dream of so 
^ many classes previous to ours, be- 
came to us a reality, and we were the 
first group to have the proud distinction 
of gracing the new halls of learning as 
Seniors. 

It has been hinted that we are an un- 
stable class, full of whims and vagaries, 
and our varying choice of class officers 
has been offered as proof of our incon- 
sistency, but, remembering that the 
greatest of personages have not been 
wholly free from this characteristic, we 
point with pride to our selection in our 
senior year : 



President LeBaron Briggs 

Vice-President Robert Sampson 

Secretary Audrey Dutton 

Treasurer Mary Brigida 

The first social event to be held in the 
new gymnasium was the Senior Dance, 
as a result of which our treasury was 
pleasantly increased. 

The School Circus was presented and 
received with as much favor as was the 
previous one, undoubtedly because we, 
as seniors, were glad to offer our diver- 
sified talents. 

We record with some satisfaction the 
fact that through one of our members 
enjoyment was provided to the whole 
school, for the music for dancing after 
all of the Friday night basketball games 
this year was furnishd by our Joe 
Correa and his orchestra. 

So the Class of 1937 becomes history! 
But, you assert, you find no words of 
blame, no suggestions of the human 
frailties in the conduct of the Class of 
'37? You say— Ah! I feared it — this 
class historian has not maintained the 
standards of accuracy which she pub- 
licly embraced? 

But may I meet question with ques- 
tion in a last despairing effort to estab- 
lish my position — is it not possible that 
the Class of 1937 was without error, 
without defect? Is it not possible that 
the Class of 1937 could do no wrong? 

Ruth Flagg 



"These are especially strong shirts, 
madam. They simply laugh at the 
laundry," said the salesman. 

"I know that kind. I had some that 
came back with their sides split." 



"Have you eaten anything that was 
left in an open tin?" was the first ques- 
tion of the physician as he examined the 
ptomaine victim. 

"Yep," replied the patient, "I went on 
a picnic yesterday and the lunch was 
left in the fliver all morning." 
Carpenter — "Didn't I tell you to notice 

when the glue boiled over?" 
Assistant — "I did. It was a quarter past 

ten." 

TRY THIS 
Motor Cop (after hard chase) — "Why 

didn't you stop when I shouted back 

there?" 
Driver (with only $5 but presence of 

mind) — "I thought you just said, 

'Good morning, Senator.' " 
Cop — "Well, you see, Senator, I wanted 

to warn you about driving fast 

through the next township." 



THE PTLGRIM 



Last Will and Testament 



E, the illustrious and benevolent 
Class of 1937, being about to take 
our much-lamented departure from P. 
H. S. ; deem it wise, expedient, and indi- 
cative of our profound gratitude, to be- 
queath the following items to those who 
have sustained us in our exigencies : 

To Mr. Shipman : A football suit and 
helmet in order that he may be properly 
equipped to challenge Mr. Handy's team 
on the gridiron. 

To Mrs. Raymond: A blotting-paper 
carpet for her home room to assist her 
in carrying out her resolution to keep 
her floor free from ink spots and other 
unseemly blotches. 

To Miss Brown : Individual booths to 
be used by Senior history students dur- 
ing the ordeal of tests. We seek to allay 
all suspicions — hence our parting gift. 

To Mr. Packard: Permission to fill 
the crack in the swinging door between 
Mr. Smiley's room and his, in order to 
keep the boys' minds on their work dur- 
ing second period study. 

To Mr. Mongan : More bulletin space 
for his exceptionally fine pictures and 
posters. In addition, we appoint Francis 
Soheid, the silver-tongued orator, to be 
official tacker-upper. 

To Miss Carey: A Flit gun with 
which she may exterminate pestiferous 
Seniors who gambol in the lower cor- 
ridor during fifth period. 

To Miss Wilber:A new horse to be 
employed in her now famous example 
for the dative of possession. Her old 
nag has become sway-backed and 
spavined from years of faithful service. 

To Mr. Smiley: Traps for catching 
runaway snakes. They may save the 
girls many anxious and fearful minutes 
while passing through the lower cor- 
ridor. 

To Miss Lang: A law prohibiting 
checks under a dollar. 

To Miss Jacques : A special telephone 
to Miss Carey's room. We should like to 
do all within our power to further such 
a beautiful friendship. 

To Mrs. Garvin : More Drews to put 
the girls' sports news of Plymouth High 
on the front page. 

To Miss Coombs: Perhaps a husky 
C. C. C. boy might be of some assistance 
to her in the office. Her polite sugges- 
tions to remove the corporeal presence 
seem, in some cases, to fall on barren 
ground. 

To Miss Humphrey: Murals on the 
ceiling to justify her gazing upward 



while thinking. In this way, much pleas- 
ure would be instilled into the teaching 
of such mysterious things as the differ- 
ence between abstract and concrete 
nouns. 

To Dr. Davis: An invitation to a 
musical program composed of modern 
hit tunes under the direction of our 
well-known swing master. 

To Miss Kelly: A little box to run 
overhead on wires (such as are used in 
department stores) to carry her mis- 
sives to Miss McNerney. 

To Miss Dowling: A supply of alco- 
hol — for removing paint from the hands 
of her art students. In the future, 
students may be spared the necessity of 
dashing to Mr. Packard's room. 

To Mr. Knowlton : A senior class 
which will appreciate his athletic award 
system. 

To Miss Johnson : Her choice of a 
lower desk or a higher chair, so that she 
may keep an eagle eye on her study hall. 

To Miss Locklin : A few more wood- 
en compasses for blackboard work in 
order that the string and chalk method 
may be abolished. This gift will save 
pupils many anxious moments. 

To Miss Rafter : Roller skates equip- 
ped with sirens on which she may effi- 
ciently police the cafateria. 

To Mr. Bagnall : A sum of money to 
finance a private printing of his version 
of European history. Some of his the- 
ories on "Nap" and the "Iron Duke" 
have proved most interesting. 

To Miss Judd: A standing order with 
some reliable fruit store for an apple to 
be delivered to her on each and every 
school day. 

To Miss McNerny: A new set of 
much-needed cooking utensils so that 
her talented pupils (especially the Sen- 
ior boys) may really do justice to the 
culinary art. 

To The Class of 1938: More girl 
athletes. It looks as though Mrs. Garvin 
will have teams composed only of Soph- 
omores and Juniors next year. 

To The Class of 1939 : Several enter- 
prising members who will always keep 
the ball rolling in class meeting. Our aim 
is to eliminate those deadly lulls during 
which everybody waits for somebody 
else to do or say the right thing. 

Drawn, signed, and sealed in the 
office of Ivan Noffulitch and Haven One- 
too and to be executed by I. B. Seenya 
and Otto Burnit. 

Joseph Brewer '37 
Robert D. Sampson '37 



THE PILGRIM 



Rogues' 

STANLEY ADDYMAN 

This boy knows the blight 

lights, — 
For it was through his art 
That in the play at Christmas 

time 
Lights played so great a part. 



IRIA ALBERTINI 

Popeye may have his spinach* 
But Iria knows vitamins, too; 
In class she told the teacher 
It's carrots she likes to chew,. 




Gallery 

THELMA BENTLEY 

"Why don't you go to Pem- 
broke High?" 

I asked this girl one day, 

"Because the heai*t does 
fonder grow 

When one is far away?" 



BEATRICE BERNIER 

She hurries to school 
At a minute to eight, 
We wonder just who 
Keeps her out so late. 



HOWARD ANDERSON 

Butterfly flits to and fro 
From school upon his bike, 
And laughs at those he 

passes by — 
For they all have to hike. 



BARBARA ARMSTRONG 

With such wild abandon 
She chooses to sneeze 
That our hair stands on end 
And we shake at the knees. 



FREDERICK BARBIERI 

"Man Mountain" Fred, our 

athlete, 
Right Tackle on the team, 
Is anchor man for vaulting 

stunts: 
Steam rollers can't budge 

him. 



RUTH BARTLETT 

Her Joe's a fine musician; 
Her Joseph leads a band; 
Her Joseph is her idol; 
In short, her Joe's just grand. 




MARY BODELL 

Minerva has accorded you 
Gifts so wondrous fair 
That on you we place a lien: 
We would your glories share. 



BLANCHE BORGHI 

As a friend and good sport 
She takes the prize: 
At whatever she does 
She's tops in our eyes. 



ELEANOR BREWER 

She likes to walk, 
She's always gay — 
And when there's talk, 
She has her say. 



JOSEPH BREWER 

We're sure you've made a 

record, 
But still we grieve and 

moan — 
For in this picture one can't 

see 
The height to which you've 

grown. 



THE PILGRIM 



FIORA CAPPELLA 

He wields a dustcloth 
With charm and finesse — 
A model husband 
Could do no less. 



NICHOLAS CARBONE 

The basketball teams 
And the plays they u 

most — 
Nick can recite them, 
From coast to coast. 



ABEL CARVALHO 

Carvalho is able 
In more ways than one: 
We're so far from subtle 
You must get the pun. 



JOSEPH CATON 

"Why must I be tormented?" 
Is his sad wail of woe: 
Your plight we do not pity, 
You love to tease us, Joe. 



JOHN CAVICCHI 

He pores day and night 
Over figures and facts: 
He thinks Period Five 
The one time to relax. 



MADELINE CAVICCHI 

Who's her favorite maestro? 
We've followed many clues, 
But the covers on her text- 
books 
At last revealed her views. 




LE BARON BRIGGS 

A boy who signs himself the 

Illrd 
Is under some compulsion 
To fire a shot heard round the 

world — 
To learning give propulsion. 



GUITANO BRIGIDA 

This lad tried not long ago 
To make well persons ill: 
Revolting foods in foreign 

lands 
He described with fiendish 

skill. 



MARY BRIGIDA 

The senior class upon this 

lass 
Bestowed a guerdon rare: 
To be labelled its Best Citizen 
With most honors will com- 
pare. 



RUTH BUMPUS 

Who owi.s a slow but winning 
smile? 

Whose hair is golden, too? 

Who likes to paint the live- 
long day? 

No one but Ruth, that's who! 



RUTH BUTTS 

To be a second Lily Pons 
Is all you ask from men: 
When we see your name in 

lights, 
We'll say, "We knew her 

when — " 



ALLEN CAPPELLA 

To milk a cow he'll tell you 

how, 
It's easier than it looks: 
Which proves again the 

adage — 
All knowledge's not in books. 



THE PILGRIM 



EDWIN CHADWICK 

We know he likes to bowl; 
He also can play pool, 
But when he comes to class, 
He's quiet, as a rule. 





JOSEPH CORREA 

When our hair has turned to 

silver 
And we've come to wear a 

frown, 
Impatiently our children tell 

us, 
"We must dance: Correa's in 

town." 



WILLIAM CLARK 

(larky had a limousine, 
Kept walkers on the jump- 
Clarky ran into a tree: 
II is car rests in the dump. 





PHILIP COVELL 

If you lose your combination, 

Here's the thing to do: 

Just get Phil (who knows 

them all) 
To dial it for you. 



HAZEL CLEARY 

She's inclined 
To be talkative 
With eyes 
Most provocative. 








RITA CRISTOFORI 

Rita's our mimic: 
Don't earn this girl's wrath 
Or a cartoon of yourself 
Will rise up in your path. 



ROY CLEVELAND 

Music hath the power, 'tis 

said, 
To soothe the savage breast — 
And so our cave-man, 

Cleveland, 
Puts the saying to the test. 






MARY CURTIN 

No curtains for Mary! 
We dare to foretell 
That after she leaves us 
For herself she'll do well. 



THELMA COOK 

Says Thelma, "If I could have 

my way 
As to what my work should 

be, 
The sign upon my door would 

say, 
"Thelma Cook, M. D." 




RITA DECOST 

The way to a man's favor 
Is found in no textbook: 
Some foolish virgins that I 

know 
Had better learn to cook! 



GORDON COREY 

He listens quietly, 
Attentive student; 
In doing that 
Perhaps he's prudent. 





CLARENCE DELANO 

Delly's a good pianist, 
Delly shoots baskets in gym, 
Delly drives an Oldsmobile, 
Yet who's seen a girl with 
him? 



THE PILGRIM 



MARY DEVITT 

What's this we hear of 
Mary ? 

She has an ardent swain? 

We hear he comes from 
Switzerland, 

And sings sweet love's re- 
frain. 





ROGER FABRI 

It must be a gift, 
We all admit that — 
If we loiter in corridors, 
We go to the mat. 



SAMUEL DICKSON 

Sammy talks 
Across the aisles, 
And when he does, 
No teacher smiles. 




CYNTHIA DREW 

When did you leave heaven? 
When were you set free? 
An "angel" here in high 

school 
Is something strange to see. 






GABRIEL FERAZZI 

"Don Juan," says young 

Gabe, 
"Was only a piker: 
It won't be long now 
Before my name shiner 

brighter." 



RUTH FLAGG 

If Ruth were but allowed to 

sleep 
As she would like; we know 
That she would break the 

record 
Made by Winkle long ago. 



AUDREY DUTTON 

We bravely suggest 

That you be a committee 

To ask Mrs. Raymond 

To define the word "drippy." 




ELSIE FORTINI 

She got 100 in a test! 
It was a great surpi'ise — 
She fools so much in studv 

hall 
'Twas mere luck, wc surmise. 



ROBERT EMOND 

When asked if he could plav 

"The Bee," 
Bobby replied, "No! 
My fiddle couldn't stand the 

shock, 
It must be made of Jell-O." 




FRANCIS FABRI 

When cats are 'neath your 

window 
A-wailing at the moon, 
Investigate before you shoot, 
For Fabri likes to croon. 






MARY GENOVESE 

"Ready, willing, and able!" 
That's Mary at our call: 
Whatever it is, she's always 

there, 
An immediate friend to all. 



TELIO GIAMMARCO 

If today at five of eight 
You were in your seat, 
A free copy of "The Pilgrim" 
Will reward you for this feat. 



10 



THE PILGRIM 



ALDO GIOVANETTI 

Don't fret about your danc- 



ing 



For here you'll pet a clue: 
Don't try to start in waltzing 
In a "size eleven" shoe. 





BENJAMIN HALL 

When Benny waves his 

dainty hands, 
We nearly all have fits, 
If he could only wear a skirt, 
He'd be our Zasu Pitts. 



TONY GOVONI 

In baseball he excels, 

In football he ranks high, 

But he's been known to say 

things . 

That make his teachers sigh. 




JULIA HALL 

As analysts of character 

We may be all wrong: 

But if she's a Saucy 

Daughter, 
Then we are all — King Kong. 



MELBA GOYETCH 

If some power should decree 
A miss was worth her weight 

in gold, 
She would have the most to 

lose 
When the scales their secret 
told. 





ANNA HANELT 

I'm sure you all know that to 
Anna 

Compliments and praise are 
manna: 

So try your ardent adulation, 

You'll win her fast capitula- 
tion. 



ELDA GUARALDI 

Who does she remind us of? 
With rolling eyes and little 

whoop? 
It isn't Greta Garbo — 
I bet it's Betty Boop. 



FLORENCE GUERRA 

Little girls should be seen and 

not heard — 
Is a precept quite well 

known; 
But that effervescent giggle 
Is a trade-mark all your own. 






r*% 




MARJORIE HARLOW 

In olden days the victors 
Chained captives to their 

carts: 
But Mar.jorie is modern, 
She chains them with their 

hearts. 



RICHARD HARLOW 

"A man without a class," 

says he, 
"A man without a girl to 

see." 
In track and basketball he's 

ours: 
The girl, we'd say, is Mar- 

jorie. 



DOROTHY HALEY 

Dottie dashes out the door, 
Freely flaunting flying feet, 
Chasing Charlie's chugging 

chariot 
That strives to struggle up 

the street. 





EDMUND HEATH 

A roar of laughter, 
An exchange of pokes, 
It's "Poker-face" Heath 
Telling us jokes. 



THE PILGRIM 



11 



ALAN HEY 

Into old Polonius 
His sword did Hamlet plunge, 
And then the royal janitor 
Picked up the corpse with a 
sponge. 

Believe it or not! 



BETTY HOLMES 

Betty says that her ambition 

Is to be late some day: 

We know full well how near 

she comes 
To having her own way. 



LOIS HOLMES 

She's hither and thither, 
And all in a dither, 
Just like an elusive fly; 
Perhaps if we hurry, 
And scamper and scurry, 
We'll catch up with her bye 
and bye. 



ROSE INGENITO 

Rose is an enigma, 

So silent, proud, and calm. 

'Tis said that people of that 

type 
Seldom come to harm. 



EVA JESSE 

Coiffures interest Eva; 
Before our startled gaze 
The latest ones from Holly- 
wood 
She quietly displays. 



PHYLLIS JOHNSON 



"I want to be 

moans, 
And in her 

nurses 
Her skill in games — 
Her art in verses. 



alone!" she 
solitude 



she 




NORMAN JONES 

After many years of study, 
He leaves his pupil's bench, 
For now he speaks pig-Latin, 
And a little pidgeon French. 



PEARL KAISER 

Lovely to look at, 
Delightful to know 
The belle of the ball 
Wherever you go. 



JOHN KELLEN 

Johnny plays a violin; 
Perhaps in future years 
The audience of a symphony 
Will applaud when he ap- 
pears. 



ARLENE KEOUGH 

"Dolly" is a little girl, 

A dark-haired, bright-eyed 

lass, 
She only asks to be a nurse: 
A credit to her class. 



DORINE KIRKEY 

A shining black car 
Comes to a stop, 
Who is he, Dorine? 
I'll bet it's "Pop." 



MIRIAM KLASKY 

Sweet girl in dress of an- 
cient days, 

Most charming and sedate, 

How could you keep from 
smiling 

When you played George's 
mate ? 



12 



THE PILGRIM 



ARTHUR LAMB 

No Mary has this little Lamb 
To follow her to school: 
To preserve his independence 
This Lamb could turn to — 
mule. 



EDGAR LEE 

No Plymouth girls for Eddie 

Lee, 
They're all old stuff to him: 
A Whitman lass has caught 

his eye; 
Her name is Evelyn. 



GEORGE LEMOINE 

We used to call him "Kinkie," 

Now it's "Cookie," it would 
seem : 

It really makes no differ- 
ence — 

If you get what we mean. 



ALMA LENZI 

She flies into a temper? 
She rants and tears her hair? 
We frankly don't believe it: 
The charge is most unfair. 



LOUIS LIMA 

He's so loyal to his home 

town, 
Its name known near and far, 
That, when he would a-riding 

go, 
He bought a Plymouth car. 



PHYLLIS LOVELL . 

We hear you boasting all the 

time 
About a boy called Dan, 
We've never, never seen him, 

Phil, 
What is he, mouse or man? 




u 




JOHN MACCAFERRI 

He hurries here, 
He rushes there — 
He's never subject 
To despair. 



ROBERT MAGEE 

As I was passing by his farm, 
I spied a beard and hat: 
Who was really under them ? 
I'm sure you should know 
that. 



FLORENCE MARSHALL 

"Dear Curly Top" we'll call 

you, 
Because that's how you look, 
We're sure that on cosmetics 
You could compose a book. 



DORIS MASI 

"Last night I went to — 
Didn't get home 'til one!" 
We wonder, Doris, where you 

go 
And what you do for fun. 



ANTONE MEDEIROS 

"Tony" has such gorgeous 

haii- 
It's the envy of the girls, 
Sometimes in stormy weather 
These waves turn into curls. 



EMILY MELLO 

When prison gates are 

opened 
And she makes her escape, 
North she'll go to Cambridge, 
Or to Falmouth on Ihe Cape. 



THE PILGRIM 



13 



OLIVE MELLO 

The night may come, we warn 

you, 

When Benny's tongue may 

slip, 
And you will find your sur- 
name 
On everybody's lip. 



RUTH NICKERSON 

Of ORTHODONTIA 
We'd not heard 
Until she introduced 
The word. 



MARIO MONTIMAGGI 

The editors and journalists 
Should bow their heads in 

shame, 
For though they all know 

English, 
They can't spell Mugi's name. 



ANNIE PAOLI 

In the Romance tongues she's 

excellent, 
But now we all contend: 
"Does she the language of 

romance 
So fully comprehend?" 



ALLEN MORELLI 

We must admit he's unex- 
celled 

As actor or as homme d'af- 
faires, 

But if it's poetry he's to say — 

We're sorry — he's "Disabled" 
there. 



JEAN PEARSON 

A counsellor at camp, 
A co-ed in a college — 
Her violin provides delight, 
No one doubts her knowledge. 



HAROLD MORELLI 

Gleaming teeth, 
Twinkling eyes — 
He's a devil 
In disguise. 






BERNARD PETIT 

When Bunny sits in history 

class 
All he does is listen, 
This, however, we have 

learned — 
The price of junk has risen. 



RAYMOND MULLANEY 

Credit be 

Unto the boy 

Who squires his sister 

With pride and joy. 



MILTON PETIT 

Milton owns a friendly smile 
And a crop of curly hair: 
Though parts of speech may 

get him down, 
He refuses to stay there. 



ARLENE NEAL 

She has the Smile of Beauty 
Fred Allen talks about, 
Though called to serve in 

many ways, 
She knows not frown or pout. 



WILLIAM PETRELL 

"Wee Willie" Petrell 

Runs through the town, 

In his father's lumber truck 

Bumping up and down. 



14 



THE PILGRIM 



EVA PINTO 

You know the Old Woman 

who lived in a shoe 
Had nothing, dear Eva, had 

nothing on you. 
'Cause we know that you 

cared for seven one day: 
Dressed them and fed them 

and sent them to play. 



JEANNETTE PIRANI 

If you have the same endur- 
ance 
At the job that you secure 
That you display in trucking, 
Your 'fame will long endure. 



ENIS PIZZOTTI 

What makes Dot so happy? 
What gave Jim the blues? 
If we don't know the answers, 
We beg Enis for the news. 



MARION PRATT 

We could think with far more 
reason 

Truth to be a liar — 

Than that this peerless maid- 
en 

From studying could tire. 



MARIE RONCARATI 

If you'd tell the truth, Marie, 
We could know which one 

would be 
The right name to link with 

yours: 
Which can make the blushes 

leap 
To adorn fair lady's cheek — 
Which one your resistance 

lowers ? 



ANENA ROSSETTI 

With dust-cloth in hand 
She's off to the fight: 
The teachers' room profits, 
She does the job right. 




WILLIAM RUDOLPH 

When the shadows of even- 
ing have fallen 

And the window-shades been 
pulled down, 

We find our Bill with his corn- 
cob pipe, 

Loafing around the town. 



JOHN RYAN 

Ryan's a banker 
And lawyer combined, 
Yet problems in history 
Vex his great mind. 



ROBERT SAMPSON 

'Tis Bob's desire to be a plebe 
We wish him great success; 
But if he'd* worked with 

greater zeal, 
We'd worry for him less. 



JUSTA SANTOS 

You'll find she's always chat- 
ting: 
When there's a thing to say, 
You may be sure that Justa 
Has said it yesterday. 



JAMES SCHILLING 

The criminals will land in jail 
And we'll more soundly sleep 
With Sleepy Schilling on the 

job, 
Patrolling on his beat. 



ALMA SCHREIBER 

A jingle will get you 

If you don't watch out! 

"A dillar, a dollar 

A ten-o'clock scholar — " 

You get the point, 

No doubt? 



THE PILGRIM 



15 



PAUL SEARS 

That boy Sears is anything 
But an ignoramus: 
Add a Roebuck to his name, 
And then he will be famous. 



JUNE SEAVER 

She won't dance! 

She won't prance! 

She may be a Ginger Rogers, 

But she won't take a chance. 



ELLEN SHAW 

She's better looking 
Than Martha Raye: 
And her "Wow!" and "Oh, 

Boy!" 
Are just as gay. 



FRANCIS SHEA 

We know all about you, Shea, 
We've heard about your 

"Bet"; 
We know you see her every 

day 
And, when you don't, you fret. 



ETHEL SHWOM 

"The play's the thing," says 

Ethel, 
"My metier this will be — 
To tread the boards, to play 

the part — 
Oh, that's the life for me!" 



SIDNEY SINK 

His willing heart 
And clever hands 
For making posters 
Await our commands. 




RITA SMITH 

Her flair for facts and figures 

She willingly would sell 

For skill to weild a curling 

iron, 
Rebellious locks to quell. 



ELIZABETH SNOW 

From capabilities like yours, 
From willing hands and such 
Are fine girls made. To list 

them 
Is asking much too much. 



HELEN SPURR 

You make no bid for the spot- 
light 

But go quietly on your way, 

Content to do what must be 
done 

Throughout each livelong day. 



VINCENT STEFANI 

Since Store Pond has not 

frozen, 
Your patience has been tried; 
You could not thrill the girls 

this year 
B-' giving them a ride. 



ALFRED SWIFT 

Alfred is that quiet lad 
Who has a friendly smile: 
From Sagamore he rides 

each day 
O'er many a (tiresome?) 

mile. 



ELVIRA TADDIA 

Our facile pen moves slowly, 
We're wracked by indecision; 
So many fine things we could 

say 
We can't decide on which one. 



16 



THE PILGRIM 



AKRIGO TASSANARI 

When things don't go his way, 
He utters sounds most weird: 
If he would copy U. S. Grant, 
He could mutter in his beard. 



AUGUSTA TAVERNELLI 

"Gussie" made a handsome 

lad 
When she danced the minuet, 
But no real masculine quality 
Have we found in her — yet. 



EDWARD TONG 

Ding! Dong! here comes Tong 
With an explanation: 
He tells us just what he be- 
lieves 
Without affectation. 



MARJORIE TRACY 

She's something of a paradox, 
If you know what we mean: 
She's not a shrinking violet, 
Yet at blushing she's su- 
preme. 



BEATRICE VINCENT 

Calm your fears, young lady, 
We don't deal in dirt: 
You know full well 
What we say here 
Isn't meant to hurt. 



ROY WEBBER 

"Cue Ball" isn't heard from 

much 
In his High School classes, 
But in sports we're fairly sure 
With A's he always passes. 




MARY WEILD 

When in a quandry, Hamlet 

Paid, 

"To be or not to be", 

When tormented, Mary wailed. 

"You can't hyperbole me!" 



GEORGE WHITE 

"One may smile 
And be a villain" — 
To prove Hamlet right 
George White is willin'. 



FRANCES WTRZBURGER 

Girls like Fran are rare. 
She's ladylike and sweet; 
The girls of modern times 
With her cannot compete. 



ALICE WOOD 

We must propound a question, 
Because it baffles all — 
She looks demure and harm- 
less, but — 
Wat's she got on the ball? 



VINCENT YANNI 

Someone stole his heart 

away: 
What's the lady's name, you 

say? 
No mere mortal made a hit, 
'Twas Parts of Speech that 

did the trick. 



ANITA ZACCHELLI 

We'll call you Zacchv, not 

Kelly, 
For it's easier to explain: 
That there's little Irish in you 
Is obvious from your name. 



THE PILGRIM 



17 



Class Prophecy 



<$ 



jTWO decades have passed since the 
"' memorable graduation day of the 
Class of '37," ventured John Ryan, the 
president of the Consolidated Can Com- 
pany, to three of his business associates 
as they sat enjoying a quiet evening at 
the Old Colony Club. 

"By Jove, you're right, it is 1957 ! 
You make a rather opportune observa- 
tion, my dear Mr. Ryan," mused 
LeBaron Briggs, dean of Harvard, 
emerging from behind the "Boston 
Herald" (not Miss Brown's). Then to 
show how his fine intellect had absorbed 
the news of the day, he continued, 
"Have you seen the headlines this even- 
ing? Stanley Addyman has invented a 
new mechanism called the Futurescope. 
I suggest we run over and spend the re- 
mainder of the evening with him. What 
do you say to that, Mr. Brewer?" 

Mr. Brewer is now a financial wizard, 
rather closefisted, but a shrewd business 
man. "Good idea, Baron. Possibly I 
could transact a little business deal 
profitable to all of us. Does this idea 
appeal to you, Mr. Sampson?" 

"Immensely," replied Sampson. Rob- 
ert, a retired midshipman, (who has 
never seen actual service) is now acting 
as Harbor Master for the town of 
Plymouth. 

Realizing that we were persons of 
little social standing, for we consisted of 
one loquacious senator, one impoverished 
broker, and a Swing Band Orchestra 
leader, we had nothing to say. But cur- 
iosity prompted us to follow. Our desti- 
nation being at some distance, we 
climbed into a Rudolph-Diesel-powered 
coupe and followed Ryan's Super- 
charged Fabri Deluxe Special. Shortly 
after starting, we observed a disheveled 
characted frantically rending his hair 
and exerting brute force upon a defense- 
less lamp pole. We stopped only to find 
Alan Hey, architect, on the verge of dis- 
traction. Barbara Armstrong, noted 
aviatrix, had given him definite orders 
to build a round house on a square foun- 
dation. 

Continuing on our mission, we were 
forced to slow down to allow a person to 
cross the road. It was Gordon Gorey, the 
famous phrenologist, who was slowly 
going mad trying to interpret a new 
bump which had appeared upon his 
cranium. Further on, we passed the pre- 
tentious mansion of Harold Morelli, the 
surrealist. Our most opportune arrival 
permitted us to see Harold dodging a 



vase of the Ming Dynasty, thrown by 
the pretty hands of Madeline Cavicchi, 
former Edgar Lee's Follies girl. Made- 
line had unleashed her violent Latin 
temper. 

We dashed down a side street and 
passed the pawn shop owned and oper- 
ated by none other than Howard Ander- 
son. Our Rudolph-Diesel-powered car 
now took us to an exclusive cafe, Gae- 
tano Brigida, Proprietor, where only the 
best of sea-food was served. We stop- 
ped to sample the specialties of the 
house, prepared as only chef Roy Cleve- 
land (with the voice you love to hear) 
could prepare them. Over in one corner 
there arose a commotion. Voices grew 
louder, arms flew faster — and we recog- 
nized four of our old classmates. Sam 
Dickson, the head of the United Sewer 
Diggers, was arguing with Robert 
Emond, head of the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra, about the age-old problem of 
the best place to park chewing gum. 
Edmund Heath, lisping cowboy of High 
Street Creek, attempted vainly to put in 
a lisp edgewise with the aid of Ben Hall, 
the neurotic cigar manufacturer. The 
discussion became so heated that Guy 
was forced to call the riot squad, and 
soon those intrepid arms of the law, 
Captain Roger Fabri, Lieutenant Ray 
Mullaney, and "Flatfoot" Fran Shea, 
entered to quell the disturbance. 

We were ofl again towards our desti- 
nation, and in our haste we nearly ran 
down Roy Webber, billiard champion, 
who was having hysterics because the 
cue ball and the eight ball had jumped 
from the table and refused to be con- 
trolled. , 

But now our trip was ended, and we 
found ourselves outside the Addyman 
Laboratories. The doorman was a huge 
fellow, Fred Barbieri by name. The big 
brute refused us admittance, but per- 
mitted those whom we followed to enter. 
Undaunted by this rough rebuke, we 
stealthily sped to the rear of the build- 
ing to climb the fire escape, barely es- 
caping detection by the night watchman, 
Francis Fabri. Traversing the roof, we 
were fortunate enough to find a skylight 
directly over the main laboratory. There 
below us we could see Addyman gesticu- 
lating wildly, as any true scientist should, 
and as he always had. He had just wel- 
comed his four visitors. It was impos- 
sible to overhear any of the conversa- 
tion, but the center of interest was a 
huge machine. We gathered that Addy 



18 



THE riLGRIM 



was explaining some intricate mechan- 
ism. He finally pulled a switch, adjusted 
a coil, and turned a dial. Light flashed 
upon the screen and meaningless blurs 
resolved into faint outlines. We were 
pleased to observe that the mechanism 
was a definite improvement over tele- 
vision. 

Imagine, if you will, the surprise we 
experienced when before our very eyes 
we saw on the screen Thelma Bentley 
teaching English in the Plymouth High 
School. Entering Miss Bentley's room as 
a visitor was Audrey Dutton, now 
eighth vice-president of the Chinapig 
Bank. Miss Dutton had evidently heard 
a new joke and was relating it to Miss 
Bentley with much gusto. 

The figure on the screen changed. We 
ascertained that Ruth Bartlett was sit- 
ting in a New York studio watching Joe 
Correa, Swing King, give last-minute 
directions to a character billed as "the 
inebriated piano player," because he 
wandered all over the keyboard. It was 
none other than Clarence Delano, who 
stood joking with Jeannette Pirani and 
Margy Tracy, The Harmony Sisters, 
and Ellen Shaw and Ends Pizotti, fea- 
tured artists on the Maccaferri and Me- 
deiros Music Hour. George White, in- 
ternationally known radio announcer, 
was reading a fan letter from Allen 
Cappella, cattle dealer. 

The scene shifted again, and now 
there was revealed to us the Anne 
Hanelt Deluxe Night Club. Among the 
glamorous entertainers in the floor 
show, we recognized June Seaver, 
Arlene Neal, Beatrice Bernier, and Rita 
DeCoste. Seated at the tables was a 
group of fashionable ladies evidently 
having a reunion of some kind. Among 
them we recognized Mary Bodell, noted 
novelist; Mary Brigida, efficiency ex- 
pert ; Mary Curtin, graduate of Consim- 
middle College, (who is still trying to 
get rid of a license purchased at Sears 
Roebuck) ; and Ruth Flagg, the war- 
den's secretary at Sing Sing. Sitting 
alone, Phyllis Johnson, dressed in a 
Hart Schaffner and Marx suit, was 
absorbed in "Esquire." „ 

Now there was revealed to us the in- 
terior of the great science building at 
Radio City. A group of serious-minded 
scientists was gathered in the center of 
the laboratory enjoying a game of dom- 
inoes, galloping. We recognized among 
them Edwin Chadwich, Jr., Authority on 
Fleas ; Arthur Lamb, Distilling Ex- 
pert; Vincent Yanni, Contamination 



Investigator; and Louis Lima, the lead- 
ing authority on Portuguese Sausages. 
All four each eminent in his peculiar 
field, were enjoying a few moments of 
recreation before they attempted to 
solve the great problem — which came 
first, the chicken or the eggl The re- 
search work has been going on for more 
than twenty years. 

Another flash and we gazed upon the 
college classroom of Prof. Kellen, A. B. ; 
N. U. T. ; B. V. D. ; professor of Latin 
at Boner's College. 

The Futureseope again shifted, and 
we scrutinized the All-American foot- 
ball team. Captain Telio Giammarco 
was drilling some green boys who looked 
suspiciously like Nick Carbone of B. C, 
Arrigo Tassinari, H. C. ; Tony "Jumbo" 
Govoni, L. S. C, (Lothrop Street Col- 
lege) ; and Edward Tong of Colgate. 
The captain was apparently having a 
difficult time, for the boys still clung to 
their high school technique. 

Now we observed Sidney Sink Jr., 
whose hobby was going around painting 
original mustaches on sign boards. Vin- 
cent Stefani, private detective for the 
Scribblit Advertising Agency, was fol- 
lowing him about, waiting to secure a 
new species of handlebar mustache to 
complete his evidence for convicting 
Sink. Almost at the same moment the 
screen showed us Alfred Swift, Chief of 
Police of Cedarville, making his one and 
only arrest in twenty years of duty. The 
prisoner was "Two bits" Magee, who 
had parked a bicycle overtime. , 

Ah ! Milton Petit ! great shortstop for 
the "Boston Bees." With the aid of Petit, 
the Bees have a fine prospect of winning 
the pennant. Fiora Cappella, president 
of the Kum-on-up-sum-time Agate Com- 
pany, is an enthusiastic supporter of 
"The Bees." 

Suddenly the locality changed to a 
scene quite different from anything we 
had viewed as yet. A huge dreadnaught 
plowed the seas. Inside the elaborate 
admiral's quarters we saw a dignified 
gentleman hiding behind a flowing 
mustache. Shades of Neptune ! Why, see 
who it is ! It's George Lemoine. The last 
we heard from him, he was working on 
a plan to eliminate holes from Swiss 
cheese. We still can't trust our eyes. 

On deck were three gobs. Believe it or 
not, they were Abel Carvalho, Richard 
Harlow, and Joe Caton. Caton was try- 
ing to extract a bicuspid from a plug of 
tobacco, while Carvalho was admiring a 
mustache to which he had been devoted 



THE PILGRIM 



19 



since 1937. Harlow had recently aband- 
oned his campaign to return to favor the 
celluloid collar. 

Another quick change and the Future- 
scope portrayed a court scene. By this 
time nothing could surprise us. Ernest 
Hamblin a judge! but he was sleeping 
through the important case of Petrell 
vs. Giovanetti. Bill Petrell, the lumber 
magnate, was suing Aldo Giovanetti for 
the abduction of three thousand hard 
pine knots. Petrell had employed Ber- 
nard Petit, the famous criminal lawyer, 
and Giovanetti had retained Philip 
Covell. Philip, conserving his energy, 
had in turn hired J. J. Schilling to inves- 
tigate the claims of Petrell. 

The jury consisted of twelve women 
(honest men are extremely difficult to 
find) and Petrell's chances of winning 
the case were negligible ; the women re- 
fused to be bribed. Scanning the faces 
of the bored jury, we found many old 
friends: Iria Albertini, Marie Roncar- 
ati, and Blanche Borghi (still together), 
Hazel Cleary, Melba Goyetch, Rita Cris- 
tofori, Justa Santos, and Thelma Cook. 

Reluctantly, we had to abandon the 
stirring events of the court scene, but it 
is only fair that we should acquaint you 
with the achievements of our fair jury. 
Iria, Marie, and Blanche have estab- 
lished a World-wide Love Bureau. 

Eleanor Brewer and Dot Haley have 
made their fortune through "The Bounce- 
It-Off Stables." How feminine aversion 
to avoirdupois has persisted through the 
years ! , 

Hazel and Ruth Bumpus are suppos- 
edly rival dietitians. Hazel makes a 
specialty of prepareing diets for the un- 
derweight while Ruth is doing a thriv- 
ing business prescribing for the obese. 
We have been led to believe by the town 
tattler, Mary Devitt, that Ruth and 
Hazel are working together. Ruth fat- 
tens them and sends them over to Hazel, 
and Hazel works in the opposite direc- 
tion. Gould this be a violation of the 
Anti-Trust Act? 

Elsie Fortini, Rita, and Justa have an 
Italian Restaurant in North Plymouth. 

Thelma Cook, we learned through 
Miss Devitt, is the wife of Admiral G. 
F. Lemoine, and has been devoting her- 
self to the bringing up of five little mid- 
shipmen. Little George Jr., wants to be a 
marine, much to Papa Lemoine's dis- 
gust. 

Melba is the proud owner of a danc- 
ing school where all the innumerable 
new dance steps are taught. 

Next we found ourselves looking in 
upon Alice Wood, wealthy society ma- 



tron, who was at present entertaining 
a group of outstanding socialites. 
Among the guests was Mr. Gabriel 
Ferazzi, Esquire, prominent business 
man of the town. Mr. Ferazzi has mon- 
opolized the industry of cellophane rain- 
coats. Although this task required 
many years of plotting and scheming, he 
had finally succeeded in attaining his 
great objective. 

Another guest was Mrs. Harold Clark, 
(Mary Weild to those who knew her), 
who now wore two pairs of glasses so 
that she might see properly. She was 
sipping tea with her hostess. 

Annie Paoli, famous composer and pi- 
anist, was playing an accompaniment 
for Ruth Butts, famed Metropolitan 
Opera star. Miss Butts ended her song 
on a note which Miss Paoli was unable 
to locate upon the keyboard. 

Miriam Klasky, authority on colonial 
furniture, was explaining the merits of 
a rickety chair to Ethel Shwom, who has 
also climbed the ladder of fame as a 
comedienne. 

In one corner of the room Beatrice 
Vincent, world-famous tap dancer, was 
showing an intricate dance step to Wil- 
liam Clark, the town playboy. Bill was 
having a difficult time, and suggested 
that Beatrice take a drive with him in 
his new beach wagon. The dinner gong 
rang at this moment and Bill postponed 
his drive until later in the evening. 
Everyone was soon seated (three sec- 
onds flat) and food was brought to the 
hungry guests who knew, however, that 
their hunger would not be appeased un- 
less they liked fish. 

Professor Addyman again manipulat- 
ed the controls of his invention and upon 
the screen appeared a stately mansion, 
surrounded by beautiful lawns and 
shrubs. A sign at the entrance to the 
drive read, "Young Maids' Home Soci- 
ety." This organization had been estab- 
lished by and was supervised by none 
other than Cynthia Drew. After Miss 
Drew's graduation from P. H. S., she 
determined to become an old maid be- 
cause her gala night life had been some- 
what suppressed during her Senior year. 
We were shown the interior of the 
lounge where many young maids had 
gathered. The radio was being oper- 
ated at full blast, and music in the 
Benny Goodman manner filled the air. 
There was a little confusion in the cen- 
ter of the room and we noticed someone 
"swinging it" in the midst of the group. 
It was Phyllis Lovell ! What was she 
doing here? We later learned the sad 
explanation. Phyllis had jilted so many 
Continued on page 33 



20 



THE PILGRIM 



A Student's Idea of a Faculty Meeting 



^trtR. SHIPMAN, tenderly tacking 
-** down the little plume at the back of 
his head, and clearing his throat: 

"Meeting please come to order! I 
presume you all know precisely why I 
have called this special meeting. We are 
here to discuss the all-important ques- 
tion . . . what can we do to pay a fitting 
tribute to that glorious, remarkable, and 
extraordinary CLASS OF 1937 on the 
eve of its departure from this building?" 

(Awed silence at mention of the 
sacred name.) 

Miss Kelly and Miss Johnson whisper- 
ing together — 

'Bzz, bzz, bzz, don't you think so?" 

"Bzz, bzz, bzz, yes, indeed !" 

Mr. Bagnall, aroused by the whisper- 
ing from his pensive mood, shouts . . . 

"Take a rest!" 

Mrs. Raymond (rising) "From a psy- 
cological viewpoint, a bronze plaque, in- 
scribed with the full name of every mem- 
ber of (reverently) the CLASS OF 1937, 
would be most suitable. Besides being 
a valuable contribution to the school, it 
would be educational, inspirational, 
etcetera, etcetera, don't you know? I 
move that we pay tribute to A MOST 
UNUSUAL CLASS in this way." 

With an embarrassed laugh, Mr. 
Smiley tucks back into his vest pocket 
the curious head of that pesky snake from 
the wilds of Manomet. There are 
frightened feminine squeals and Miss 
Humphrey cautiously moves away. Then 
she rises and fixes her eyes on Mr. Mon- 
gan's travel poster which portrays the 
Alps in all their orange glory. (As 
everyone knows, Mr. Mongan is especi- 
ally addicted to these colorful pano- 
ramas.) Clearing her throat, Miss 
Humphrey speaks. 

"I second Mrs. Raymond's motion. 
Who knows but that some day, we may 
be able to point with pride to one of 
those engraved names and say, 'We 
knew him when !' " 

The determined voice of Miss Carey 
is heard. 

"Personally, I think there is entirely 
too much fuss being made about this 
matter. I have my doubts as to the 
worth of the Senior Class. The Sopho- 
mores, now! There's a class for you! 
They are intelligents, polis, merveilleux, 
n'est-ce pas, Mademoiselle Jaques?" 

Miss Jacques nods her head vigor- 
ously. 

"Mais oui," she affirms, "oui, oui !" 

Confusion reigns at this sharp differ- 



ence of opinion. Mrs. Raymond prepares 
to rise to the defense of the Class! Miss 
Carey firmly maintains her position. 

The tension is broken by Miss Lock- 
lin's pleasant laugh. With a few well- 
chosen words, our great intermediary 
pours oil on the troubled waters and 
soothes the ruffled feelings. 

Suddenly the acrid odor of something 
burning assaults the nostrils of all those 
present, except Mr. Packard. He does 
not notice the odor, for he has become 
quite inured to one or another by years 
spent in the chemistry laboratory. 

Miss McNerny sniffs apprehensively, 
then rushes quickly to the door. 

"Oh, I might have known those boys 
from the cooking class would ..." but 
the rest of her speech is lost as the door 
slams behind her. 

Everybody is growing restless now. 
Miss Wilber and Miss Rafter begin to 
discuss the fall of the Roman Empire. 
Dreamily, Dr. Davis hums ~a strain from 
"Liebestraum," anxious to return to his 
girls' glee club. Mr. Knowlton and Mrs. 
Garvin glance worriedly at the clock. Is 
it time for their daily workout with the 
dumbbells? Miss Dowling closes her 
eyes in pain, to shut out the glare of the 
travel posters. They are beginning to 
upset her. 

Suddenly, above the hubbub, the voice 
of Miss Judd rings out. 

"Pull-lee-uz, let's get back to the mat- 
ter in hand." 

Then there is silence, and all eyes are 
focused upon Miss Brown as she slowly 
and majestically rises from the desktop, 
dislodging Miss Lang who has been 
fondly brushing chalk from her back. 

"Why don't we gather up all these 
threads, these odds and ends and little 
details, and tuck them into a nutshell? 
I suggest that we clinch the question 
by taking a vote on the motion before 
the house." 

Miss Lang . . . "Question, question!" 

Mr. Shipman . . . "All those in favor?" 
? ? ? I ! 



We leave the outcome of this remark- 
able meeting to your imagination, dear 
readers. 

A M 2 



We hope that you will do unto Otir 
Advertisers as they have done by us. 



THE PILGRIM 



21 



^j's (iitriiinti rsiiiiiiJiiiiicsiiiiitiini tC3iiiiiiiiini csiiiiiiiiiiiicstitiiiiiiiiicsiiEiiiiiiiiicsiiiiiiiiiiiic^aiiiiiiiiiiiic^iiiiriirtiticsiiifdtriiiirr^iiiiiiiiKitc^itiieiiiiiiic^iiiiiiiiiiticsiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiii c 7^1 

I Name Nickname Ambition § 



Stanley Addyman 
Iria Albertini 
Russell Anderson 
Barbara Armstrong 
Fredrick Barbieri 
Ruth Bartlett 
Thelma Bentley 
Bernice Bernier 
Mary Bodell 
Blanche Borghi 
Eleanor Brewer 
Joseph Brewer 
Le Baron Briggs 
Gaetano Brigida 
Ruth Bumpus 
Mary Brigida 
Ruth Butts 
Allen Cappella 
Fiora Cappella 
Nicholas Carbone 
A.bel Carvalho 
John Cavicchi 
Joseph Caton 
Edwin Chadwick 
William Clark 
Hazel Cleary 
Roy Cleveland 
Thelma Cook 
Gordon Corey 
Joseph Correa 
Philip Covell 
Rita Cristofori 
Mary Curtin 
Rita De Coste 
Clarence Delano 
Mary Devitt 
Samuel Dickson 
Cynthia Drew 
Audrey Dutton 
Robert Emond 
Francis Fabri 
Roger Fabri 
Gabriel Ferazzi 
Ruth Flagg 
Elsie Fortini 
Mary Genovese 
Telio Giammarco 
Aldo Giovanetti 
Tony Govoni 
Mclba Goyetch 
Elda Guaraldi 
Florence Guerra 
Dorothy Haley 
Benjamin Hall 
Ernest Hamblin 
Anne Hanelt 
Marjorie Harlow 
Edmund Heath 
Allan Hey 
Betty Holmes 
Rose Ingenito 
Eva Jesse 
Phyllis Johnson 
Norman Jones 
Pearl Kaisei 
John Kellen 
Arlene Keough 
Dorine Kirkey 
Miriam Klasky 
Arthur Lamb 
Edgar Lee 
George Lemoine 
Alma Lenzi 
Louis Lima 
Phyllis Lovell 



"Stan" To be a good electrician 

"Iri" To go to Tennessee 

"Andy" To beat out "K" 

"Barbie" To be a nurse 

"Fred" To be a professional clam digger 

"Ruthie" To be the Only One 

"Grammie" To be a commercial artist 

"Bea" To get up early 

"Bottle" To be a comedienne 

"Patsy" To be in the fog 

"Eleanor" To be a wall flower 

"Joe" To be a chorus girl 

"The Baron" To be a dictator 

"Guy" To be president of C. D. A. 

"Ruthie" To trail along with you 

"Bridgit" To live up to her name 

"Ruth" To pick les "Fleurs" 

"Cappy" To be a farmer 

"Pete" To be a male nurse 

"Nicky" To be a coach 

"Abel" To be a second Clark Gable 

"Cavic" To be a ball player 

"Josie" To go to Tulare, California 

"Sandy" To be a mad scientist 

"Whacky" Not to wreck cars 

"Irish" To be a schoolmarm 

"Bing" To be loved 

"Thel" To be a nurse 

"Flash" To be better than that 

"Joe" To go crazy 

"Phil" To be remembered 

"Rix" To own a saxaphone 

"Mack" To learn how to drive 

"Temper" To be a fat cook 

"Delly" To be a second Fats Waller 

"Honey" To be someone's "stenog" 

"Sammie" To act like a gentleman 

"Cyn" To be Miss Jacques' pet 

"Shorty" To grow a few inches 

"Bob" To play "The Bee" 

"The Great" To be A. B; PH. D; D. D. 

"Rog" To be rich 

"Gabe" To stick to one 

"Jeff" To be Warden of Sing Sing 

"El" To be a lumber jack 

"Speed" To be a good business woman 

"Telio" To be B.A. 

"Al" To be a farmer 

"Jumbo" To own a flea circus 

"Mel" To be Mrs. 

"Shorty" To be an interior decorator 

"Gracie' To talk like a senior 

"Dot" To live in Plymouth 

"Bennie" To own a scooter 

"Ernie" To be a football player 

"Ann" To be a nurse (Eddie's) 

"Mare-'' To be a torch singer 

"Ed" To be Kate Smith's husband 

"Jake" To know what he's talking about 

"Holmes" To join the Navy 

"Ro" To own a violin shop 

"Jesse" To be someone's friend 

"Dizzy Dean" To be a pitcher 

"Jonesy" To loaf 

"Pearl" To be an old maid 

"Johnnie" To learn to play golf 

"Dolly" To be a nurse 

"Renee" To be a housekeeper 

"Mimi" To be a good secretary 

"Art" To do a home lesson 

"Eddie" To be a cook 

"Kiki" To be a great master 

"Alma" To be Ro*bert Taylor's secretary 

"Mala" To be a sailor 

"Phil" To keep a steady fellow 



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22 



THE PILGRIM 



^•C3iiJiiiiiiiiic3iiiiiitintic3 Iiaiiiiiiiiic3titiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiitic3iiiiiitttiiic3itiiiiiiiiiic3ftijiiiiiiiir2tiii riiiiiiic3iiiiiiiiiiiic3iiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiic3iiiiiiiiiiiicaitiiiiiiiiiicaiiJiiiiiiiiic3iiiiiniiiiic3^ 

Name Nickname Ambition | 

To be a fashion plate 

To be a "city slicker" § 

To be a hairdresser | 

To be on a committee 5 

To be a professional caddy 

To be Mrs. f 

To be a nurse j§ 

To be a help | 

To be a second Cab § 

Not to be like his brother 

To own a bake shop | 

To dance with Fred Astaire 

To be an "A" student 5 

To be a French teacher 

To meet the King of England 

Nothing jj 

To make the first team 

To stay out of trouble | 

To meet Adam 5 

To finish the bathing suit 

To be a certain Mrs. 

To be a policeman 5 

Almost anything | 

To get a good report card 

To join the army S 

To be a Vagabond Lover 

To act like a senior § 

To earn a living g 

To be a Sherlock Holmes | 

To lead a German Band 

To be a bell hop g 

To stay out of Fords | 

To steer a straight course 

To find Juliet | 

To be a Fannie Brice 

To be in a business position 

To meet Clark Gable | 

To play the bones = 

To outlive her nickname 

To be in love 5 

To be an orator I 

To have correct shorthand 

To be alone | 

To own a Packard 

To be a pilot = 

To be a Ginger Rogers c 

To be a dancer | 

To graduate | 

To be Mrs. Clark 5 

To truck | 

To go to B. U. (Why?) | 

To stay in overalls c 

To get A in English f 

To study the 5th period 



John Maccaferri 


"Mac" 


Robert Magee 


"Bud" 


Florence Marshall 


"Flo" 


Doris Masi 


"Dot" 


Antone Medeiros 


"Tony" 


Emily Mello 


"Molly" 


Olive Mello 


"Oily" 


Mario Montimaggi 


"Monte" 


Allen Morelli 


"Al" 


Harold Morelli 


"Hal" 


Raymond Mullaney 


"Ray" 


Arlene Neal 


"Blondie" 


Ruth Nickerson 


"Ruthie" 


Annie Paoli 


"Ann" 


Jean Pearson 


"Sunny" 


Bernard Petit 


"Bunny" 


Milton Petit 


"Mittie" 


William Petrell 


"Pooch" 


Eva Pinto 


"Eve" 


Jeannette Pirani 


"Nettie" 


Enis Pizotti 


"Enie" 


Marion Pratt 


"Prattie" 


Marie Roncarati 


"Maria" 


Anena Rossetti 


"Nene" 


William Rudolph 


"Rudy' 


John Ryan 


"Jack" 


Robert Sampson 


"Bob" 


Justa Santos 


"Justa" 


James Schilling 


■'Shilling' 


Alma Schreiber 


"Schreiber" 


Paul Seal's 


"Sears"- 


June Seaver 


"General" 


Ellen Shaw 


"Bella" 


Francis Shea 


"Romeo" 


Ethel Shwom 


"Ettie" 


Sidney Sink 


"Sinky" 


Rita Smith 


"Rita" 


Elizabeth Snow 


"Betty" 


Sarah Spurr 


"Spooks" 


Vincent Stefani 


"Vinny" 


Alfred Swift 


"Swifty" 


Elvira Taddia 


"Vera" 


Arrigo Tassinari 


"Rego" 


Augusta Tavernelli 


"Gussie" 


Edward Tong 


"Eddie" 


Marjorie Tracy 


"Margie" 


Beatrice Vincent 


"Bea" 


Roy Webber 


"Dutch" 


Mary Weild 


"May" 


George White 


"Georgie" 


Frances Wirzburger 


"Frannie" 


Alice Wood 


"Punky" 


Vincent Yanni 


"Vinny" 


Annita Zacchelli 


"Kelly" 



I Compliments of j 

Dutton Motor Car Co. 

j 115 SANDWCH ST. 

I OLDSMOBILE I 

CADILLAC LA SALLE 

1 Tel. 1500-W 

I SALES SERVICE j 

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THE PILGRIM 



23 



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AS WE ONCE WERE 




1 KEY TO STUDENT BABY PICTURES | 

1 1. Ruth Nickerson 8. LeBaron Briggs = 

| 2. 6th Grade at Cornish School 9. Julia Hall | 

| 3. Joseph Brewer 10. Stanley Addyman | 

| 4. Ruth Bumpus 11. Phyllis Johnson | 

3 5. Norman Jones 12. 3rd Grade at Mt. Pleasant School 5 

1 6. Madeline Cavicchi 13. William Clark | 

| 7. Elizabeth Snow 14. 3rd Grade at Mt. Pleasant School § 

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24 



THE PILGRIM 



UP AND DOWN THE CORRIDORS 



77[HE Seniors of next year will not have 
^the valued services of Miss Charlotte 
Brown. At the present writing, Miss 
Brown, who has a year's leave of absence, 
is debating whether to take a course at 
Columbia, or accept a position in the 
Land of the Rising Sun . . Although we 
are the first to graduate from the new 
building, the Class of 1937 has had a bad 
effect on teachers. Immediately after 
they struggled with us, the school has 
felt the loss of Miss Hayes, Mrs. Swift, 
and now Miss Brown . One student who 
hasn't received lower than an A on his 
card for four years assured us in history 
that "the Shenandoah Valley flows 
northward." . . . Our dictionary of nick- 
names includes : the office, "Grand Ho- 
tel" ; the broadcasting system, "The In- 
former" ; the Roving Delegate, Monti ; 
Sampson, Bob Boob ; Cynthia, Flannel- 
feet; Baron, Dictator; Madhouse, lunch- 
room; Phyllis Johnson, Dizzy (don't 
think the editors will allow that last 
one). Who's Butch?... We heard that 
the S. A. S. President (his name slips 
us for the moment) was around the yard 
picking up refugees. ... A cheer for Mrs. 
Raymond for her now classical war cry, 
"Come on, my College Entrance Beau- 
ties." .. Do you remember: the alumni 
Day Dance ; our Sophomore Hop ; the 
look on Billie's face when the chair broke 
in Class meeting; Morelli's attempts at 
basketball (Quel homme!) . . . What 
happened to Ryan's eleven bucks? ? ? 
the football? P. G. Chandler's lip? . . . 
We predict a bright and successful liter- 
ary career for Mary Bodell ; a new dean 
of Harvard ; a rowboat for Sampson ; 
George White's admittance to the bar; 
the movies for Jeanette and Margie ; an 
invention by Jones. . . . Jumbo should 
be a jockey! He and his horse could 
always win by a nose, huh? . . . With 
drivers like Curtin, Henry Ford needn't 
worry about selling cars ! . . . An orchid 
(a la Winchell) to Mr. Packard for his 
noble, sympathetic, patient, and under- 
standing attitude with the Physics class. 
In your own words, sir, "Carry on" ! . . . 
Billie Petrell would be a good one from 
whom to buy clothes. He'll give one suit. 
The suit will include two pairs of pants, 
one black and one white ; and two suit- 
coats, one white and one black . . . Who 
was the bright soul who thought Eddie 
Tong was a Chinese War? . . . Can you 
picture Kellen behind bars? In the bank, 
of course. Addyman behaving? . . . We 
suggest a violin for Rudy if he continues 
to let his hair grow. Musicians can get 



away with it, Rudy According to 

the high school fire fighting enthusiasts, 
a new, red, shiny truck to be on call at 
the high scool would make a good class 
gift . . . Alan "Bird" Hey giving the 
right answers ? And now for a longshot 
prediction — Bectause of so many re- 
quests we are venturing to guess who 
will be the first to prefix Mrs. to her 
name. As Dan Cupid seems to have smit- 
ten her hardest, and because her ambi- 
tion in the memory book backs me up, I 
pick Mary Weild to be the first married ! 
(I'll pay other claimants to hold off and 
establish my reputation as a true proph- 
et). Punkie's ambition is to be a nut (says 
the memory book). Perhaps on Wat- 
son's car ! . . . Does anyone ever remem- 
ber hearing the finish of the Armistice 
Day poem entitled "Disabled"? . . . Tick- 
ets will soon be on sale for Ethel's first 
appearance on the stage. Between being 
an actress and a Socialist Candidate for 
Senator, Miss Shwom will be very busy. 
Francis Fabri will oppose Miss Shwom 
for that Senate job. . . . Warning to 
Benny Goodman — Joe Correja's com- 
ing ! . . . Best athletes — Telio and Cyn- 
thia ; Best laugh — antics of Norman 
Jones; Tallest, Audrey Dutton; Short- 
est, Joe Brewer; Best period — 12:02- 
12:26. And as we wander up and down 
the corridors for the last time, all we can 
say is, so-long, building; so-long, teach- 
ers; so-long, gang! Had fun, didn't we? 

Yann Rian 



FROM SONG AND STORY 



Big Broadcast of 1937— Glee Club 
Murder With Pictures — 

Senior Graduation Photos 
Old Faithful — Friday Exams 
Wonder Bar — Cafeteria 
Danny Boy — Phil's theme song 
The Way You Look Tonight- 
Graduation gowns 
End of the Trail — June 
The Trumpet Blows — Ask Enis? 
The White Angel — Ruth Nickerson 
Fury — Petrell 

Bullets or Ballots — School Elections 
Forgotten Faces — Class of 1937 
Educating Father — Mr. Mongan 
High Tension — Before a test 
Rhythm On The Range- 
Boys' Cooking Class 
Green Pastures — School Lawn 
Farewell Blues — Graduation 
Seems I've Done Something Wrong — 

6th Period Bookkeeping Class 
I'll Stand By— Mrs. Raymond 
Curly Top — Florence Marshall 

E. A. P. '37 



THE PILGRIM 



25 



PRINCIPAL'S COLUMN 



& 00N after I began the study of 
™ German while still a student in a 
preparatory school, I read a very simple 
story entitled "Ungedank ist der Welt 
Lohn". The translation is, "Ingratitude 
is the Reward of the World". This story 
was composed of citations of several in- 
cidents, plausible enough to be credible, 
which tended to prove that the statement 
contained in the title was generally true. 
I was not ready at that time, neither am 
I ready now, to accept the declaration 
without reservation, for I know there 
are many, many people who have been 
sincerely grateful for help given in time 
of need. On the other hand, the following 
accounts, the truth of which I can vouch 
for through personal knowledge, might 
well have been included in the story. 

How would you feel if you had loaned 
a young man a substantial sum of money 
to enable him to procure a college educa- 
tion, only to observe that almost before 
he secured a position he appeared on the 
road with a brand new automobile and 
was apparently oblivious to the fact that 
he had any financial or moral obligation 
to discharge? Furthermore, how would 
you feel if the months and years rolled 
by and no attempt was made to repay 
the loan or give any explanation as to 
why the loan could not be repaid? 
Wouldn't you be constrained to say as 
did the benefactor concerned in this 
case, "I wonder if it was worth while?" 

Again, you are in the grocery busi- 
ness. You have been established for a 
number of years, have a reputation for 
honest dealing, and have served your 
neighbors and friends as customers. The 
chain stores come in and lure away their 
patronage. Then one of your former 
customers has a bit of hard luck and is 
temporarily unable to pay cash for his 
purchases. He, therefore, returns to you 
and asks that you extend to him the 
privilege of running a charge account, a 
request you readily grant. What hap- 
pens? When he regains his financial 
footing, your erstwhile friend again 
patronizes the chain stores, leaves you 
an indebtedness of approximately $200., 
and carries his groceries home in a 
brand new car. Do you feel like doing 
it again? 

College men are often quite indiffer- 
ent to their obligations. I know that in 
one of our New England colleges only 
about one-half of the boys aided from 
the "loan fund" ever make any attempt 
to repay their borrowings. Thus they 
fail to meet their obligations squarely 



and prevent other needy students from 
getting assistance. 

I am compelled to believe that in- 
stances such as these I have related are 
typical and occur altogether too fre- 
quently. I am equally convinced that 
there are many other situations which 
offer a direct contrast to them and dis- 
close much happier conditions. I think 
there can be no question about which 
are the more desirable and commenda- 
ble. Admittedly every one works better, 
— with much more zest and greater sat- 
isfaction, if his efforts are appreciated. 
A genuine "Thank you" is a tremendous 
help. But gratitude can and should ex- 
press itself in deeds as well as words. 
May I urge at this time when you are 
contemplating what the future may 
have in store for you after graduation 
that you include as an integral part of 
your philosophy of life an attitude of 
genuine appreciation? And may I urge 
further that you give due expression to 
that appreciation by fulfilling all obliga- 
tions and by transcending, if possible, 
the highest hopes of your friends, your 
well-wishers, or benefactors? I beseech 
you to do whatever you can to disprove 
the truth of the declaration that In- 
gratitude is the Reward of the World. 
Wayne M. Shipman 
Principal 



Who ever heard of a Cook 

without any meals? 
Who ever heard of a Harlow 

without any goodbye? 
Who ever heard of a Carbon 

without any monoxide? 
Who ever heard of a Hey 

without any straw? 
Who ever heard of a Marshall 

without any law? 
Who ever heard of a Neal 

witout any stoop? 
Who ever heard of a Spurr 

without a boot? 
Who ever heard of a Curtin 

without any window? 
Who ever heard of a Snow 

without any storm? 
Who ever heard of a Flagg 

without a pole? 
Who ever heard of a Wood 

without any trees? 
Who ever heard of a Schilling 

without any cents? 
Who ever heard of Holmes 

without any rents? 
Who ever heard of a Lima 

without any beans? 
Who ever heard of a Jessie 

without any James? 



26 



THE PILGRIM 




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tne caffmat we etsau. 
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now muck the-te 14 to feavil ll/i ate not ivue, 
£ut uoana anlfwnble, and out uouthful pleasures 
lo plaju, io dope, pete -fiance to dream, awhile , 
To lauoft, to 4ina, to dance in carefree ^tufe 
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tfot heat of eaaerneif that baiM todauf 
Our tiUpplication heaz . Tot tivi jre piay^ 



THE PILGRIM 



27 




HURRAH! A HOLIDAY! 



A S the years roll on, our great noli- 
'**' days, both national and interna- 
tional, are gradually losing their mean- 
ing. The significance of each holiday is 
being obscured in a morass of celebra- 
tion. 

To the schoolboy, a holiday is a glad- 
some event; mainly because that day is 
one on which he may escape from school 
and amuse himsalf as he pleases. To 
the worker, a holiday means a few mo- 
ments of surcease from toil and care. To 
the housewife and mother, alas, a holi- 
day is not a day of rejoicing, but of 
work. Usually she must prepare a 
hearty meal while attempting to sub- 
due exuberant childish spirits. 

One of the holiday attractions is the 
creaking festive board. Our principal 
holidays are almost entirely celebrated 
with large dinners. In fact, Thanks- 
giving is looked forward to mostly be- 
cause of the noble turkey. The custom 
of eating a lavish meal originated with 
the Pilgrims ; but the thankfulness of 
our forefathers is forgotten when we 
plunge into the festivities. 

Christmas, originally the most solemn 
celebration of the Christian world, has 
degenerated into an orgy of gift-giving. 
The children of today first associate 
Christmas with the mythical figure of 
Santa Claus. The presentation of gifts 
has its association with the first Christ- 
mas; however, presents are now the 
major part of our greatest holiday. 
Somehow, in the mad rush of a depart- 
ment store at Christmas time, one sees 
only a mob of avid shoppers hastening 
to complete a disagreeable task as soon 
as possible. 

The Christmas gift should satisfy a 
long-felt want and should be given 
selflessly. Too often, he who gives the 
present merely proposes to surpass the 
gift which he hopes to receive in return. 
While the store-made Christmas is very 
lovely, the home-made Christmas is 
often more satisfying. 

Although we still sing carols and 
somewhat retain the spirit of good-will, 



the true significance of Christmas has 
been lost. In the hustle and bustle of 
the modern world, we find less and less 
time to devote to sentiment. Surely this 
day of the year should be commemorated 
as well as celebrated. 

On Easter Sunday, a day celebrated 
throughout the world as a holy day, 
thousands of women who do not regu- 
larly attend church, come to services. 
The majority of these women come, not 
because they feel any special significance 
in that day, but because they want to 
exhibit a new spring ensemble. Chill 
winter winds may blow, yet only a bliz- 
zard can prevent the fashion parade be- 
fore and after services. The choir may 
sing with the sweetness of angels, the 
organ may whisper or thunder its ex- 
ultation, the minister may rise to the 
pinnacle of eloquence, but all to often 
Mrs. Smith is distracted by the fact 
that Mrs. Jones is arrayed in a hat iden- 
tical to that one which she herself wears. 

Perhaps Memomorial Day is commem- 
orated with more authentic emotion 
than any other holiday. Yet, even on the 
clay reserved for us to reverence the 
memory of our soldiers, some thought- 
less individuals consider the time ap- 
propriate for packing a picnic basket 
and going for a ride. 

It is not necessary that one be prig- 
gish or unduly solemn in the celebration 
of holidays. However, somehow the 
spirit with which our forefathers in- 
tended the holidays to be invested, has 
been almost submerged by the material 
elements. Phyllis Johnson '37 



A WOODLAND RETREAT 

'Neath hooded trees of solemn mien, 

Through aisles unmarked by human tread, 

I passed alone. That sylvan scene 
Will long be one I may recall 

When thinking of what might have been. 

In calm profound the still retreat 

Seemed e'er to echo every step 
As I advanced with eager feet. 

I was a mere intruder there 
So far from noise and busy street. 

The inspirational appeal 

Of woodlands clad in wintry garb 

Is something one cannot but feel. 
The silence and the church-like air 

Make worldly troubles seem unreal. 

Thelma Bentley '37 



28 



THE PILGRIM 



Junior Poetry Page 



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TREES 

(With apologies to Joyce Kilmer) 
I think that I shall never see 
A sight more wretched than a tree. 

A tree whose hungry mouth is pressed 
With signs of, "Homer's Tourist Rest"; 

A tree who looks at cars all day 

And shouts, "Good eats one mile away"; 

A tree that may in summer wear 
Garage signs — some here, some there; 

Upon whose bosom snow has lain 
Above the carving, "Tom loves Jane." 

Signs are nailed by fools like me, 
But only God can make a tree. 

Elizabeth Anderson 



VOLCANO 

Sultry, sullen, 
Grumbling, roaring, 
Boiling and seething — 
Smoking, furious, 
Mad with power, 
A raging beast — imprisoned — 
Steaming with rage 
Until it is loose. 

Then it crawls down the crater side, 
Like many serpents, 
Writhing, stealing ever closer 
Upon the sleeping village 
At its side. 

It envelops everything in lava- 
Like the sinister potent of an evil witch 
Pleased with destruction; 
Bubbling with pleasure, it hesitates, 
And cools to a hard black crust, 
Which hides from the view of man 
The evil work. 

Eileen Payson 



]IIIHirillMC:3llllllllhMIC3niM Mill) IC3 JIUII t(MIIC31lllllllllllC3lflllllI1IIIC3ltIIIIllllllC3flflllllll]lC33IIIIIIIIIIIICailllllflllllC3llllllllllt[r3llllllllllllC3IIIIIMIIIIIC3llllllll IIIIC3rilMIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIIIMIC37^= 

I ANGLING I 

§ A summer day, a rod and line, a dozen hooks § 

g or so, g 

| A can of bait. With all these things, guess | 

where a boy would go! § 

g No other sport could equal it; and what more g 

I would you wish | 

| Than just to go to Riley's Pond to spend the | 

g day and fish ? g 

= I like to sit upon the bank, as quiet as can be> I 

g And watch the water smooth and still, until a g 

| sign I see § 

= That means I have a bite, and then, of course, e 

g I pull the line g 

| And catch a Blue Gill or a whale — or maybe | 

= eight or nine. § 

I There is no joy like fishing on a sunny sum- § 

e mer's day, s 

g To take your rod and line and hook, and pass g 

e the hours away, = 

I And think of only pleasant things, with all your e 

g worries gone. g 

e Say, get your old straw hat; I'm goin' fishin', § 

e boys, come on! | 

„" g Vernon Kirkey g 

"SIII^JIIIIIilESIIIIIIIiilllC^llllflllllllCSIIII iTTl tll(C3IIMIIIIIIttC3]M1IIIIIHIC:3llilllllllliC3IllJ)JIIIIIIC_3llllllllllltCJIIIIII 1 1 ■ I ■ I C3 • 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 C 3 ■ ■ ■ 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 C3 1 1 1 iTi ■ !»!■ t C3 ■ I ■ I ■ 1 1 1 1 1 ■ I C3 1 ■ I ■ ■ 1 1 ■ ■ IllCai t •■•■ II 1 1 1 1 CJf 



TO A FARMER 

Scurrying madly through the streets, 

As bees drone to their hive; 3 

Onward in the scorching heat 

To a day behind factory walls — 

And you, farmer, are not satisfied. 5 

Yours is the quiet peaceful life = 

With the sun, the stars, the sky — § 

You do not know the laborer's strife 9 

Nor long hours behind grim walls, e 

And yet, you are not satisfied. | 

Yours is the kind of life — s 

Utopia come true, | 

Your days with nature all are spent, e 

Your love of man will never die, 

Oh, farmer, do you wonder why? — we envy you. e 

Florence Canucci 



FLOOD 

Swirling waters, black and swelling, 
Drifting wreckage — some man's dwelling; 
Shrieking wind, bleak and blowing, 
Angry river banks o'erflowing; 
Quaking people, sick with dread, 
Floating bodies, cold and dead; 
Blazing fires red and flaming; 
Disease and illness death proclaiming; 
Human suffering, pain, and blood, — 
All are caused by a river's flood. 

Jeanette Hatton 



^^aiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicjiiiiiiiiiificaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiifiJiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiJiiiiiiiiicajiiiiiiiiiiiiraiiiiiiiiiiiicafiiiiififiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiititititcaiiiiiininica. - 



THE PILGRIM 



29 



"WHAT LUCK, UNCLE?" 



1JNCLE LETHER sat on a downtown street 
** corner. In his hand he held a sheaf of 
pencils and a tin cup, the latter for the con- 
venience of the purchasers of the former, and 
on his knees he held Sorrowful Susie, a dilapi- 
dated accordian. It was more through Sorrow- 
ful Susie that he earned a living than through 
the pencils, for, after all, pencils are only a 
commodity that one can buy almost anywhere, 
whereas Sorrowful Susie advertised Uncle 
Lether at least a block off, and when the traf- 
fic was light, two blocks. 

There were no business opportunities for 
Uncle Lether's kind, but on a busy street cor- 
ner, sitting on a camp stool with the whining 
of Sorrowfull Susie to attract attention, he 
managed to earn a living of sorts from Mobile's 
kind-hearted public. It was of necessity a 
hand-to-mouth existence. Changes of season 
were propitious because the people discarded 
certain clothes and assumed certain others, 
and regular patrons were likely to drop a bun- 
dle of wearables alongside Uncle Lether's camp 
stool. 

But dependence on the public was a pre- 
carious thing. Happily, life and experience had 
made of Uncle Lether a philosopher, if not a 
stoic. Years of ploughing and spading under 
semi-tropical sky, of struggle against the in- 
imical forces of nature and of life had bred in 
him endurance. He bore the fogs of early win- 
ter and dampness of early spring, showers 
and downpours, humidity and drouths, sunlight 
and thunderstorm. Sometimes when the sun 
grew hot, he shifted his stoo! to a shady spot. 
When it rained, he let it rain on him, unless 
the downpour became too great. Then he would 
retire to a convenient entry or portico, where 
he would efface himself humbly against a wall. 

Uncle Lether brought Son-owful Susie's whine 
to a creaking halt and looked into the tin cup. 
He shook it and counted his earnings despond- 
ently. It was five o'clock in the afternoon and 
the number of pencils had barely decreased 
that day. 

"Spec folks don' wan' buy pencils Chris'- 
mus Eve," he told himself, apologizing for his 
negligent public. "Got dere min's busy some- 
whar's else." Christmas had been hard on 
Uncle Lether. Crowds were thicker and more 
hurried and more careless. Sometimes people 
stepped on Uncle Lether's feet and jostled his 
stool almost fi - om under him. He had to guard 
Sorrowful Susie carefully, too, because dam- 
age to Sorrowful Susie would be a tragedy for 
her owner. 

Darkness comes easily in midwinter, even 
to Mobile. A dinginess fell upon the streets, 
footsteps quickened, here and there a light 
twinkled. Soon it would be dark and there 
was slight chance of Sorrowful Susie's at- 
tracting any trade after nightfall, even if 
Uncle Lether's aching old body could hold out 
longer. He sighed and braced himself for a 
final effort. One more tune from Sorrowfull 
Susie and then he'd go home. He coaxed a 
whine gently from her shabby and faded folds. 
His old tired voice rose quaveringly in earnest 
strains against Susie's moan. No clink of coin 
cheered his ear, however, so he rose reluct- 
antly and prepared to close up his business for 
the day. 

A handsome limousine slowed up by traffic 
droned at the corner and its occupant, looking 
out lanquidly, saw the old man. The despondent 
figure held the observer's eye. Uncle Lether 



saw the splendid car, the liveried chauffeur, 
and gave a gasp at the figure sitting in the 
back seat. He blinked a time or two. 

"Lokky dat, will yuh! First time I ebber seed 
nigger chauffin' nigger. Black ez de ace ob 
spades en dress lak white man, hunk, hunk! 
Neveh seed nigger like that befo' Look lak 
king ob cah-na-val, he do." , 

Others besides Uncle Lether stared at a sight 
unusual in Mobile — the sight of a black man 
groomed and pressed lolling in a monster car, 
with another black man for chauffeur. Santa 
Claus himself wouldn't have aroused such com- 
ment, amusement, and in some cases, indigna- 
tion, but in Uncle Lether it aroused only mirth. 

The stranger, his light gray felt at a doggy 
angle on his head, leaned out of the window of 
his car and gazed at Uncle Lether. Finally he 
gave an order to his chauffeur, leaped from the 
car, and approached Uncle Lether. 

"What luck, Uncle?" he addressed the as- 
tonished old man. 

"How dat? Wot, suh? Luck? Hunk? Ain't 
had no luck today. Guess folks too busy 
ruslin' gifts to want pencils, Suh." 

The stranger peered into Uncle Lether's cup. 
A pucker of thought creased his polished fore- 
head. Then, a sudden decision seemd to strike 
him. He took off his hat and clapped Uncle 
Lether's old flapping one on his head in itL> 
place. "Give me your coat," he told the old 
man. He threw Uncle Lether his own neatly- 
pressed garment and grabbed Uncle Lether's. 
Then an extraordinary scene ensued. 
Gone in a minute was the elegant young negro. 
In his place was a "genuwine nigger," thought 
the astonished Uncle Lether, with a shabby hat 
over his woolly head and scare-crow coat flap 
ning on his swaying figure, and shuffling feet 
like those of a cottonfield darkie. Sorrowful 
Susie woke up startled, whined vigorously, and 
passersby were no longer indifferent. It was 
as if Sorrowful Susie had recognized a master 
hand. Boldly out to the curb the stranger 
jigged, playing Sorrowful Susie in a way that 
awoke memories of plantation life. He was 
obstructing traffic, but nobody cared. People 
were blocking the sidewalk, but nobody cared. 
The stranger paused, a clamor arose. The droll, 
good-natured face beamed amiably at the 
crowd, and the crowd guffawed back. 
"De early bird taks de worm, 
But who gwine tek de worm enyhow?" 

A policeman came up frowning to investigate 
the mcb. But he stayed to listen. The singer 
was growing sentimental. Negro spirituals 
held the crowd spellbound. 

Before their magic had subsided, the quick- 
footed negro was in and out of the crowd with 
Uncle Lether's old hat held firmly in both 
hands. Coaxing here, joking here, and flatter- 
ing there, he collected. When he returned, the 
ancient hat sagged dangerously. Uncle Lether's 
eyes popped when he saw the money. 

"Mah hebbenly Fadder," he expostulated. 

The stranger was removing Uncle Lether's 
old coat and putting on his own elegant one. 
He rearranged his hat and trousers and dusted 
off his shoes. 

"I hone that you have a good Christmas, 
Uncle," he said. "I was born in Alabama my- 
self, and seeing you brought back old mem- 
ories. Good luck to you, Uncle." 

Uncle Lether barely managed to emit a 
"Tanky, Suh," as the stranger walked briskly 
across the sidewalk, leaped into his car, and 
was swallowed by the slowly-moving stream of 
traffic. It was all a dream to Uncle Lether. 



30 



THE PILGRIM 



It couldn't have happened, he said to himself as 
he hobbled his way homeward along the avenue. 
He stopped at a dazzling electric sign visible 
for blocks ahead. It revealed two colored 
figures on a billboard, one an elegant, suave 
man, the other a rowdy, jigging, cotton-field 
darky. In letters two feet high were the words: 
"Dolty Walters, The Greatest Negro Comedian 
in the World, Fresh from European Triumphs 
— Christmas Week Onlv at the Arbian 
Theatre!" 

Uncle Lether gaped at the figures — but of 
course Uncle Lether couldn't read. 

Vernon Kirkey '38 



LEARNING TO SKATE 

TjT HERE comes a time in your life when you 
^ wonder, what move to make next, and 
whether, after you have made that move, it will 
pi-ove to have been for the best. 

that time comes when, on a cool December 
morning, you put on a pair of skates for 
the first time in your life, and sally forth upon 
the ice to seek new fields of adventure. 

You slowly place your feet on the ice and 
are quite surprised to find that you are able to 
stand on them at all. Your pleasure is short- 
lived, however, for as you advance one foot 
cautiously, your other foot comes up not quite 
so carefully. It is not long before both feet 
are out in front and gaining fast, and you have 
the rather giddy feeling that you are in an ele- 
vator which has broken loose and is falling ten 



THE FLAMING SWORD 

Many are the years we've toiled, 

Fashioning a gleaming blade. 

May its honor ne'er be soiled — 

Hope and faith in us betrayed. 

Flaming sword! 

Wrought of finest, truest steel — 

Knowledge, service, labor, trust; 

Splendid precepts these to seal 

Our pact. Light our path! You must, 

Flaming sword! 

Tempered in the fires of woe, 

Sorrow, hopes once dashed aside 

Test our weapon as we go 

Forward. Raise our courage tried, 

Flaming sword! 

Gladsome hours bejewel the hilt; 

Fill our hearts with mem'ries fond — 

Friendships that of joys were built, 

Closely may you weld the bond, 

Flaming sword! 

"Thirty-seven," comrades all, 

Flourish high your flashing brands, 

Sally forth from castle wall! 

May your presence guide our hands, 

Flaming sword! 

Phyllis M. Johnson '37 



floors to the cellar. When the crash comes, you 
sit there stunned and wonder if you had better 
try it again. 

If the day is sunny and rather warm and the 
sun has formed a small amount of moisture on 
the surface of the ice in a few places, you 
invariably pick one of these in which to land, 
which is disconcerting to say the least. In 
this event you are not quite so likely to sit and 
meditate as you were in the former case. 

Finally, however, you get up and try again, 
and perhaps this time you go about five steps 
before the ice comes rushing up to meet you 
the second time. Before a half hour is over, 
you have been able to glide a few yards with- 
out a fall, and you have learned to fall more 
scientifically in order to reecive only a mini- 
mum of bruises. , 

You then notice that the other skaters go 
faster by sticking their foot into the ice and 
shoving. You try it and find that the method 
works. However, the following summer you 
realize that the method is not for general use 
when you strap on a pair of roller skates and 
attempt to dig your foot into the smooth ce- 
ment sidewalk on which you are skating to find 
it a bit more unyielding than was the ice. 

The rest of the morning you devote to the 
improvement of your technique, and you ob- 
serve with cheer that the number of falls is de- 
creasing. When you go home at noon with 
aching feet, you try to kid yourself into think- 
ing that you have learned to skate, but you 
know that it will be a long time before you 
become a second Irving Jaffee. 

Richard Tubbs '39 



CEMETERY IN LATE AUTUMN 

Still is the wind, in heavy, brooding peace, — 
And dim, the light. Drab whorls of draggled 

leaves 
Long-dead, trace slow parabolas from weary 

trees, 
Who, with stark limbs uplifted, wait — and 

grieve. 
The somber gray of this ephemeral day 
Blends with the gray of headstones, dims their 

lines. 
Did ever grass her soothing fingers lay 
On this hard earth? Did glossy myrtle vines 
Embrace these stones and intimately cling 
To fragrant ground? Did mauve wistaria gay 
Enrich the place with jewels of amethyst? 
Once — it seems long ago, the glance of Spring 
And Midas-touch of sun made gladsome, this, 
Awoke its beauty, drove the gloom away. 

Mary Bodell '37 



WOODS IN WINTER MOONIGHT 

The round full moon its bright light sheds 
On whitened earth this winter night. 
Each pine tree bears its load of snow 
In silhouette against the sky. 

The rabbits from their sylvan beds, 
Small birds from perches start in fright 
On hearing near at hand their foe, 
The great horned owl, no killer shy. 

The silence and the stillness clear 

Are further broken by the sounds 

Of geese that flee the frozen north, 

Whose honking loud makes known their flight. 

Now here we see a white-tailed deer 
That leaps away with graceful bounds. 
The fox in search of mice sets forth; 
Alive are woods on winter's night. 

L. B. R. Briggs, 3rd '37 



THE PILGRIM 



31 




PILGRIM STAFF 
First Row: M. Weild, P. Johnson, M. Bodell, Mrs. Raymond, A. Hey, A. Dutton, C. Drew. 
Second Row: B. Barnes, A. Paoli, J. Hatton, F. Fabri, L. Roberge, M. Curtin, M. Pratt. 

M. Brigida. 
Third Row: E. Coleman, F. Scheid, S. Brewster, J. Ryan, E. Tong, N. Jones, D. Tubbs. 




HONOR GROUP 
First Row: J. Ryan, R. Flagg, L. Briggs, Mrs. Raymond, A. Dutton, P. Johnson. 
Second Row: B. Borghi, M. Weild, F. Wirzburger, A. Neal, J. Pearson. M. Pratt, A. 

Paoli. 
Third Row: T. Bentley, M. Bodell, R. Cristofori. 



THE PILGRIM 



JUNIOR 
= VIEW POINTS" 

THE POWER OF MIRRORS 



AS a rule, I try not to look into mirrors any 
more than is necessary. Things are bad 
enough as they are without my going out of 
the way to make myself miserable. 

But every once in a while inspection of my- 
self is unavoidable. There are certain mirrors 
in town with which I am brought face to face 
on occasion, and there is nothing to do but 
make the best of what I see. 

I am unquestionably at my worst in the mir- 
ror before which I try on hats. I may have 
lived all winter comforted by the thought that 
I was a decent sort of person, one from whose 
countenance shone the light of honesty and 
courage which is even more desirable than 
physical beauty. I may have imagined that 
little children on the street and court justices 
out for a walk, turned when I passed and said, 
"A fine face. Plain, but fine." 

Then I decide to buy a hat. The mirror in 
the store is a triplicate, so that I can examine 
myself from various angles. The appearance 
that I present to myself in this mirror suggests 
the police department photographs of a young 
girl who is wanted on a murder charge. All 
that is missing is a scar across the right cheek. 

But for an unfavorable full-length view, 
nothing can compare with the one I get of my- 
self as I pass the shoe store. It boasts a mirror 
in the window, set at such an angle that it 
catches the reflection of people as they step up 
on the curb. When I pass by the shoe store, I 
am mortified to find that the unpleasant-looking 
girl, with the rather masculine, swinging walk, 
is none other than myself. 

The only good mirror which I have discov- 
ered is the one in the elevator. This mirror 
ncrmits only a two-thirds view, rendering it 
impossible for me to see how badly my skirt 
hangs under my coat. I have often thought 
that I might be handsome if I paid as much 
attention to myself as some girls do, and in 
this mirror my clothes look as well as any- 
body's. I wonder if it is very difficult to oper- 
ate an elevator, for if it isn't, I know what mv 
life work is to be. I shall run that car with 
the magic mirror. 

Edna Daly 



My mother never did like horses, but on 
rainy days she always found her friend. He 
is called the "Clothes Horse." 

Talking about everybody else's favorite 
horse, I haven't as yet told you mine. He is a 
racing horse. I see him many times in line, 
impatient for the signal to be given. His beau- 
tiful head held high, he is admired by the ex- 
cited crowd. The signal is given and off he 
dashes, only to be lost in a cloud of dust. 

There is one old horse who prowls around in 
the night. No one likes him. I, myself, have a 
certain horror if him. He is always seen after 
one eats too much strawberry shortcake or 
bananas smothered in cream before going to 
bed. He is called the "Night Mare." 

Anna Riley 



WHICH HORSE WOULD YOU LIKE? 



mTHE five-letter word "horse" brings many 
pictures before our eyes. Some are pitiful, 
some are amusing. Take, for instance, the 
"Hobby Horse." The "Hobby Horse" has his 
stable at the carnival. Hundreds of children 
go to see him whenever he comes to town, and 
ride upon his bare back. He is always seen 
goine in the same direction, chasing his part- 
ner who is ahead of him, and followed by many 
ethers. If wishes were horses, children would 
ride them until the moon turned green. 

Another favorite horse of the children is 
called the "Rocking Horse." He is an unde- 
termined sort of fellow, for he can never decide 
which direction he wishes to go, forward or 
backward. 

Do you know the favorite horse of a friend 
of mine who is a carpenter? It is the "Saw 
Horse." To the majority it's nothing but a 
wooden rack for sawing wood, but to him it's 
his best friend. 



FACES 

23 ID you ever stop in front of a store window 
where someone was demonstrating a new 
appliance? Of course you have. The demon- 
strator is usually a delicious young blond, an 
attraction in herself. She is showing the public 
how the "Ducky Doughnut Maker" can beat up, 
fry, and deliver the best doughnuts on the 
market. The young lady, attired in a smart 
uniform and rather red in the face from exer- 
tion, thinks personally that she wouldn't buy 
the "Duckv Doughnut Maker" on a bet. Even 
though exhausted, she smiles serenely upon a 
sea of faces, — faces that are round, narrow, 
fat, thin, kindly, serious, mean, mocking, funny, 
wrinkled, sarcastic, and laughing. 

That face in the front row, staring so fixedly 
at her, was mean and brutal. The eyes weir 
small and squinty, the mouth a mere slit. The 
sight made her shudder. Her gaze passed on 
to the face of an old man, deeply furrowed, 
with sunken eyes looking hungrily at the food 
she was preparing. She turned her glance 
quickly away and noticed over at one side a 
young ladv, evidently very bored. She stared 
straight ahead, unwilling even to look at the 
demonstration, her thin nose suggesting indig- 
nation because her escort saw fit to detain her. 

The man standing next to her grinned at the 
blonde. He had forgotten for the moment his 
companion and his surroundings. He thought 
only, "Gee, not bad! and she can cook, too." 
The lady with him started to pull away. He 
followed reluctantly. 

Pushing into their place came a stocky wo- 
man, a housewife from a stuffy little four-room 
flat on the lower East Side. She was followed 
by a meek little man who tugged fearfully at 
her sleeve, urging her to come on. She shook 
off his hand impatiently. 

"Poor little man," thought the girl. She 
studied the face of a tiny old lady with white 
wisps of hair straggling from under a perky, 
black bonnet. Her eves smiled at the girl and 
her head briskly nodded encouragement. The 
girl returned the smile. 

Far back in the crowd she discerned the 
face of a young bride. There was wonderment 
in her eyes. Would she ever be able to make 
such delicious doughnuts? Only this morn- 
ing Harry had told her she'd kill him yet, 
feeding him chunks of cement. She'd show 
him! And she made her way into the store 
to purchase the miraculous doughnut maker. 
Following in her footsteps came a tall, husky 



THE PILGRIM 



33 



fellow shouldering his way through the 
crowd. The face of the girl in the window 
lighted. She recognized that face! It must be 
near quitting time. Bill always came after her. 
He looked happy and excited. Maybe he'd land- 
ed that job after all. "Oh, please, Lord, let it 
it be so," she prayed as she smiled for the last 
time at the gradually diminishing audience and 
pulled the curtain down swiftly before that sea 
of faces. 

B. Studley 



A LITTLE AND A LOT 



&OME things that have always bothered me 
"* are things like — how much is a lot and how 
small is a little? Can a little be a lot and can 
a lot be a little? Will a lot be only a little if it 
is only a little more than the little — and a lot 
less than the lot which is a lot more than the 
original lot? Will a little be a lot if it is a lot 
more than a little, which is a lot less than the 
little which is, perchance, a lot? 

The dictionary indicates that a little is a 
small quantity and a lot is a large quantity but, 
for example, we have a piece of bread one 
inch square. If anyone were asked how much 
bread the one-inch square was, he would say 
that it was a little piece of bread but, com- 
pared to a crumb of bread, it's a lot of bread. 
If this piece of bread were given to a man, it 
would be only a little bit of bread which could 
hardly satisfy his appetite, but, given to an 
ant, it would be a lot of bread, for it would 
make him a fortunate ant in that it could sup- 
ply enough nourishment. 

Now we come to the problem of when a lot 
may be a little. A man, we shall say, has a 
lot of strength, but someone comes along and 
knocks him for a loop. Therefore, the man 
who clipped him has a little more or a lot more 
strength than the man who, presumably, had 
a lot of strength. The man who had a lot of 
strength has only a little strength compared 
to the man who overcame him but, compared 
to others, he still has a lot of strength. 

I could examine this lot and little business 
indefinitely but, as the problem is making me 
somewhat dizzy, I shall leave its further ex- 
position to others. For myself, I shall abide 
implicitly by what the dictionary says, — or 
shall I? 

George Heath 



THE SLEEPLESS NIGHT 

As a leaf goes scurrying down the street, 
With the ghostly sound of hastening feet, 

I pound my pillow and toss my head, 

While my body squirms on the burning bed. 

The room seems filled with nagging light, — 
"My curse on thee! Sleepless Night!" 

And when in a rage, I have essayed 
To quiet that flapping window shade, 

To my hateful bed I slowly go, 
When suddenly I stub my toe. 

"0 wretched chair! Thou horrid blight! 
My curse on thee! Sleepless Night!" 

I smooth the blankets from a tangled heap, 
And settle myself to woo coy Sleep. 

I find reward in my weary quest, 

For I am wrapped in the arms of rest. 

As I drift into sleep in the graying light — 
"My curse on thee! Sleepless Night!" 

Phyllis Johnson 



Continued from page 19 

CLASS PROPHECY 

suitors that her conscience began to tor- 
ment her. Then, like Queen Guinevere, 
she had withdrawn from the gay world 
into the protecting seclusion of the 
Young Maids' Home. 

There was more commotion in an- 
other part of the lounge. Someone was 
boisterously voicing an opinion. We sus- 
pected who it was almost immediately, 
and sure enough — ! it was Doris Masi. 
Doris became rather dramatic at times 
and Pearl Kaiser by her side tried to 
calm her, as usual. Perhaps you, too, 
are wondering what Pearl was doing in 
such a place as this? It was said that, in 
order to provide escape from her many 
male admirers, she had joined the soci- 
ety and found its influence helpful. As 
we inspected the building, we noticed 
other familiar faces. 

In the library we found three former 
movie actresses who could no longer en- 
dure the bright lights of Hollywood. 
They were Betty Holmes, the star of 
"The Eternal Movement"; Mary Geno- 
vese, great singing star of the "Follies 
of Plymouth, Mass."; and Julia Hall, 
famous for her glamorous love scenes 
with that great actor, Sir Mahrio Mon- 
ti-Maggi. 

Over in a far corner we observed Jean 
Pearson and Marjorie Harlow, both one- 
time dress designers, criticizing the 
clothes worn by two serious-looking wo- 
men, Marion Pratt and Elda Guaraldi. 
Elda and Marion were hiding behind 
two huge books, but we knew they 
weren't reading because they (the 
books) were both upside down. Evi- 
dently they were both absorbing Jean 
and Marjorie's conversation, and were 
just waiting for a chance to avenge their 
hurt pride. We hastily moved to another 
section of the building. 

On the westerly end of the grounds we 
stopped a moment to watch Lois Holmes 
and Florence Guerra doing some paint- 
ing. The subject presented difficulties, 
for it was a worm peeping from a large 
Baldwin apple. 

Directly behind them, in a small al- 
cove, we heard Rose Ingenito and Eva 
Jesse gossiping about the affairs of some 
of the old maids. Eva had been talking 
steadily for twenty minutes and we 
grew weary waiting for her to take a 
breath. Rose had become so engrossed 
in the conversation that she forgot what 
she was doing and knitted a chain com- 
pletely around herself and the chair. We 
moved on just as she discovered her 
plight. 



34 



THE PILGRIM 



Sophomore Poetry Page 

^'1 UUfl IIIIC^IMMII C3IIIIMMMUC3MIMII1IIIIC3IIIMMIMMC3IIIIIIIIMMC3UMUllllllC3IIMMmMIC3l 1^1 ■IIIIIIMIIC3IIIMI1IMIIC3MIIMMIIIIC3MIIIIIIIIIIC3MMIIIIMMC3MIIIIIIIIIIC3IIIIIIIMIIIC3IIMIIIIIIIIC7J. 



FINENEEDLE TRAILS 

As I walk down through woody paths, 
Through trees of brown and green, 
I see the robins taking baths 
In springs so pure and clean. 

Through bush and crooked paths I walk, 
Through every nook and lea, 
Sometimes I stop a while to talk 
To friendly birds I see. 

I pass by hemlock, spruce, and elm, 
In a world bereft of vice, 
I soon come to my secret realm, 
My woodland paradise. 

This secret wonderland, you see, 
Lies under a spreading pine, 
It seems somehow it's meant for me, 
For I have made it mine. 

Charlotte Raymond 



THE RAINIER 

A yellow monster in the night — 
A creature filled with lust, 
From whose magic eyes there pours 
A stream of silver dust. 

Exultant, on his velvet throne, 
His artistry is stirred, 
And in a shower, colors fly 
As swiftly as a bird. 

He stains with gold the mountain peaks, 
And paints the trembling seas, 
Then with a maze of crystal chips, 
He tints enchanted trees. 

Then smiling from his kingdom skies 
Into this deep lagoon, 
He sees reflected, bright and full, 
The glory of the moon. 

Ella Vitti 



"imiiiiioiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiMMHiiimiiiiiommiiiiiniimiiiiiio^ 

| ENDLESS TRAILS | 

| A trail of light steals o'er the waters, | 

= A shimmering path of golden hue, 

§ One of the many moonbeam daughters if 

I Lighting the way on the dark, still blue. § 

§ Whence does this gold trail lead? § 

| A flight of rippling, wavering stairs 

= Stretching far into the night — 

| Nobody knows and nobody cares. | 

J. Holmes i 

-—•CIllliKllttMrillllHIMIIICJIIMMMMIICIMMMlllll fc3 MMirtMI4ir3riMMnilllC311MllMI1IIC3MMII1IIIIII~'rC3IIMIIIIIMir3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3rfllMllllllC31lllllliriMCJIMIIMMHlCJIMMMIMnC.3lirtMinit!ejU]11ini<'- 



NIGHT WIND 

The clouds are playing tag, it seems 

This night, and hide-and-seek, 
And, as I watch, concerned with dreams, 

The moon from hiding comes to peek. 

The clouds are chased across the moon 

And the wind is blowing high; 
It sings to me some strange, weird tune, 

I listen — tense — to the trees' deep sigh. 

The wind is swiftly dying down, 

The moon's round face is smiling through 
Like some mischievous, happy clown, 

The clouds lie still 'gainst heaven's hue. 
Shirley Goldsmith 



| THE TRAIL OF THE BABBLING BROOK | 

I It springs from a dark, deep, crystal pool | 

g And starts on its long, long trail; 

| It flows through woods and forests cool, 
It swirls o'er sand and shale. 

= The wood folk come to drink by its sides, I 

g To frolic, run, and play — 

| As night draws nigh the frolic dies, 

= But the brook flows on its way. 

| It bubbles along to another stream, 

I And together, along they sail; 

| 'Til at last they come to the ocean, 

The end of the long, long trail. 

I Richard Tubbs I 



HiiimiiiciHiiiiiiimciiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiidiiiimiimcjn inuimiiiiiiiiniu iiiiiiiimiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiimiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiinii niiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiinimu or 



THE PILGRIM 



35 



It appeared that the majority of the 
young maids were perfectly contented 
with life here at the home, and they 
spent much of their time in reading, 
painting, knitting, and gossiping. June 
Seaver and Alma Schrieber were busy 
examining a magazine entitled "Lost 
Love." 

Some time later we learned that the 
small society had been disbanded. Cer- 
tain of the ladies could not comply with 
some of the rules. Eventually most of 
the maidens joined a revolt instigated by 
several malcontents, and Cynthia Drew's 
lifelong work crashed in ruins. 

After a short delay, the Futurescope 
produced upon the screen a fashionable 
beauty salon owned and operated by the 
four beauty experts, Olive Mello, Alma 
Lenzi, Anena Rossetti, and Arlene 
Keough. All four have spent the better 
part of their lives studying in Europe to 
perfect their art. Their beauty salon has 
acquired such a reputation that women 
from all parts of the world come to re- 
ceive treatment. Also important to the 
organization were Elvira Taddia, the 
secretary, and Rita Smith, the treasurer. 
Emily Mello and Augusta Tavernelli 
held positions as premier masseuses. 

Elizabeth Snow, having just finished 
touring Europe with the hillbilly troupe. 
"The Plymouth Rock Ridgerunners," 
was giving the "bones" a rest in order 
to receive an impermanent wave. 

Dorine Kirkey was having a manicure 
from Frances Wirzburger. Florence 
Marshall was reading a movie magazine 
while sweltering under a dryer. In the 
waiting room, Helen Spurr, owner of the 
Cashonly Department Store, was chat- 
ting with her manager, Anita Zachelli. 

Next door to the fashionable beauty 
salon was the prosperous dental clinic 
of Ruth Nickerson. Ruth has made such 
an intensive study of her chosen profes- 
sion that she has twice been awarded a 
national prize for the greatest contri- 
bution of the year to the health of school 
children. Kathryn Sampson, her secre- 
tary, was conversing with Eva Pinto. 
Eva had married a successful business 
man some years ago and was doing very 
well. She had just brought her twins to 
the dental clinic to have their teeth ex- 
amined. 

When nothing further appeared upon 
the screen of the Futurescope, Professor 
Addyman frantically manipulated the 
dials and then declared in no uncertain 
terms, "That's all." 



As the four visitors prepared to leave, 
we three observers above also began our 
descent. When we reached our Rudolpft- 
Diesel-powered coupe, we discovered 
that "The Big Four" had just departed. 
We decided to follow them further in 
their exploits. At length we found our- 
selves outside the limits of the town 
driving through a dreary cemetery. The 
four whom we pursued, halted to pick 
up Norman Jones who was indulging 
his fondness for walks in the dim con- 
fines of the cemetery. 

"To the victors," it has been said, 
"belong the spoils." Yet we imagine 
that most of the members of the Class 
of 1937 will belong to that great group 
of people who are neither spectacular 
winners nor abject losers — the Johnny 
Q. Publics who constitute the real 
strength of any nation. 

John Cavicchi 
Paul Sears 
Allen Morelli 



THE TWENTY-THIRD PSALM OF ENGLISH 



She is my English teacher. 

She maketh me to try to write to write poetry, 

And it bringeth pain unto my heart. 

She maketh me to read difficult books 

for the course's sake. 
Yea, though I work all night 
I will be no better off, for my memory 

usually fails me! 
:>hf prepareth a detailed test before 
Me all my days in High School 
She recoideth a low mark, 
surely sorrow and ignorance shall follow 
Me in the presence of my classmates; 
And I shall stay in the English class 

forever. 

B. Holmes '37 



•■••', 



g< 



THE SUN 



The sun was setting in the west, 

The heavens, all aglow 
With clouds of rose and amethyst, 

Cast shadows down below. 

The colors changed so rapidly, 

From rose to blue and gold, 
I watched their matchless gorgeousness 

More wonders to behold. 

And, as the shadows lengthened, 

I felt the majesty 
Of that far-reaching sunset glow, 

A vast Infinity. 

Francis Shea '37 



THE PILGRIM 



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THE PILGRIM 



37 




CTIVITIES 



"JllELLO, Circulation! This is the voice 
^ of Plymouth High School broad- 
casting a resume of the highlights of our 
first year in the new building! — 

The first news that directly affected 
the student body was the announcement 
concerning the postponement of the 
opening date of school. Although all 
looked eagerly forward to entering the 
new structure, an added vacation was 
welcomed. — 

On November 16, parents turned out 
en masse to inspect the new building 
and to attend the formal dedication ex- 
ercises. All were sincere in their praises. 
Earlier in the day the students had par- 
ticipated in their own dedication cere- 
monies. The guest speaker on that oc- 
casion was Dean Richard M. Gummere 
of Harvard University, Department of 
Admissions. — 

With the formality of the opening of 
the new school over, we eagerly awaited 
the first dramatic presentation. This 
came to us in the form of a presentation 
entitled, "The First Thanksgiving 
Dinner". The play, the first to be en- 
acted on the stage of our new $328,000 
building, was presented by Juniors 
under the direction of Miss Humphrey 
and Miss Judd. Now, certainly, our dra- 
matists will rise to new heights. — 

Joy swept through the Senior class ! ! 
It had been promised the first date 
for a dance in the new gymnasium. 
December 4, 1936, was the date and, 
after the committee had labored long 
and had experienced jangled nerves, the 
dancers arrived and the evening proved 
successful. — 

Close upon this affair, in fact only one 
week later, came the Fall Sports Dance. 
Needless to say that with the hustling of 
all athletes under the direction of Mr. 



Knowlton and Mrs. Garvin, this affair 
was also a success. — 

As might be expected when inspired 
by a new building, a new feature was in- 
troduced this year by the Massasoit 
Chapter of the National Honor Society. 
This innovation, Alumni Day, was well 
attended by graduates who visited with 
teachers, inspected the building, and en- 
joyed a program prepared especially for 
them. Talks by Miss Laura Brown and 
Gilbert Harlow proved to be very inter- 
esting, and these, in conjunction with a 
special musical program, provided an in- 
teresting assembly. Because of the suc- 
cess of Alumni Day, the Honor Society 
plans to make it an annual event. — 

"Christmas comes but once a year !" 
sang the Seniors. But it came too quickly 
this year, and the idea of a Christmas 
play was abandoned. Instead, under the 
guidance of Mrs. Raymond, the seniors 
presented a series of tableaux portray- 
ing, "Christmas Then and Now, at 
Home and Abroad." This was a varia- 
tion from the usual Christmas assem- 
blies, and was well received by the 
students. — 

March 19 saw our attention focused 
on Memorial Hall where the 2nd Annual 
Circus was held. The Circus, or Vau- 
Devil show, included twenty acts of ac- 
robatic feats, tap dancing, tumbling, 
and novelty dances. So successful was 
the Circus this year that plans are al- 
ready underway for next year's per- 
formance. 

On April 15 the members of the 
Student Activities Society played host 
to the Southeastern Branch of Student 
Activities Societies. Two hundred- pupils 
from various schools were present when 
President Morelli called the meeting to 
order at 4:00 o'clock. Round-table 
discussion followed the business meet- 
ing and dancing preceded the supper at 
6:30. A variety of entertainment was 
presented to the guests during the 
supper hour, and the meeting was ad- 
journed at 8:30. 

Under the sponsorship of the Student 
Activities Society, the students were 
priviledged to see three exceedingly en- 
tertaining assemblies ; one on liquid air, 
a musical program, and an illustrated 
lecture on the Klondike (Page Baron 
Munchausen!). These programs were 
beyond a doubt the kind of entertain- 
ment which educates as well as amuses. 

"First in War, First in Peace," and 
First President to visit our new school 



38 



THE PILGRIM 



was George Washington. George, im- 
personated by Lawrence Hart, was the 
feature of the Washington Assembly. Mr. 
Washington was heard to exclaim that 
the minuet danced by Junior and Senior 
girls was the best he had seen since 
"early plantation days". Miss Brown 
and Mr. Bagnell were the teacher spon- 
sors. — 

These events are only the most out- 
standing ones of the year. We all remem- 
ber many other pleasing interludes that 
will always be associated with our high 
school days. Remember the "Great 
Bruce" — you tell me how he escaped 
from the trunk; the Olympian Male 
Quartet, Zing, Zang, Zoom ! Zum ! ; the 
world's cihampion typist, Mr. George 
Hossfield ; the various movies by Luther 
Peck; and the presentation of "Snow 
Trails of 1936"?— 

Surely, circulation, you will agree 
that the past year has been one of great 
progress for Plymouth High School. We 
predict a glorious future for it. 

So until our next news roundup, the 
voice of Plymouth High bids you, "Make 
more news!" 

John Ryan 
Amedeo Galvani 



HOBO CODE OF ETHICS 

1. That no Hobo should go to work 'til 
every married man has secured a 
good job. 

2. 'Til every single man has a good job. 

3. Then, if there are any jobs left over, 
we Hoboes will take a look at them. 

Hobo News 



Teacher (jocularly) : "Do you know 
anything worse than a giraffe with a 
stiff neck?" 

Pupil : "Yes, sir, a centipede with 
corns." 



Two students on a train were discussing 

their keen sense of sight and hearing. 

One said, "Do you see that barn over 

there on the horizon?" 
"Yes." 
"Can you see that fly walking around on 

the roof of that barn?" 
"No, but I can hear the shingles crack 

when he steps on them !" 



"Why do you always address the letter 

carrier as professor?" 
"It's sort of an honorary title. You see 

I'm taking a course by mail." 




HONOR SOCIETY 
First Row: R. Flagg, A. Dutton, L. Briggs, Miss Carey, J. Ryan, M. Curtin, M. Brigida. 
Second Row: E. Shwom, M. Tracv, M. Bodell, P. Johnson, A. Neal, J. Pearson, H. 

Belcher, M. Weild, A. Paoli, B. Paty. 
Third Row: F. Scheid, W. Tedeschi, A. Galvani, F. Fabri, R. Sampson, L. Roberge, C. 

Delano, I. Albertini. 



THE PILGRIM 



39 




7|THIS is Jimmy Fuddler broadcasting 
^ to you from Plymouth where his 
sponsor, the 1937 "Pilgrim", has just 
appeared arrayed, not in Puritanical 
gray and brown, but in refreshing 
green and white ! 

And here are the latest flashes in the 
world of school publications as seen by 
your commentator's gimlet eye. 

Flash ! The originality, arrangement, 
and design of the magazines which have 
come to my desk are of such an order 
that my job of reviewing has been made 
a light and pleasant task. 

Flash ! "Snooper Says", a zestf ul 
gossip column, was one of the many 
bright spots in that attractive red and 
silver St. Valentine's issue of the 
"Wampatuck" from Braintree High. 

Flash! Notes from my little Black 
Book : 

Open letter to the editor of the 
"Unquity Echo", Milton High School : 
Dear Ed : 

Yellow roses to you for that top-notch 
magazine of yours! The cover design 
was good, the editorials well done 
(especially the one entitled "Sour 
Grapes") and the cartoons clever. 

Congratulations and commendations 
to you and your staff. It's satisfying to 
produce a magazine which is so good 
that your successor will have to look 
alive in order to maintain your stand- 
ards. 

Yours sincerely, 
Jimmy Fuddler 



(Memo: Ask editor of "The Abhis", 
Abington High, how his business man- 
ager corralled so many advertisements. 
Did he take a course in order to develop 
a forceful personality, or did he use a 
lariat?) 

I enjoyed perusing that cheerful little 
magazine, the "Orange Leaf" from 
Orange High School, Orange, New 
Jersey. It was fruitful (Yes, — I know 
that's awful !) with humor which had its 
origin in amusing school events. 

Now for that enterprising bird, "The 



Partridge", which jusi: flew from Dux- 
bury High School. It's feathered with 
quality and it wings over all the school 
news, reporting dances, plays, other 
school functions, and gossipy tidbits in 
true newspaper style. 

Flash! 
Reviews of the school magazines ! 

"The Blue Flame"— Hopedale High 
School 

Ding Ding Ding! A three-bell maga- 
zine! 

This is a mimeographed issue, en- 
tiiely student-manufactured. A noble 
effort, I'd say, and one that bears watch- 
ing. 

"Girls' High Magazine", Plymouth, 
England 

Ding Ding Ding! A three-bell publi- 
cation ! 

The size of both magazine and type is 
smaller than we commonly find in 
America, and the paper contains detailed 
accounts of school events. There is a fine 
literary section, but may we suggest a 
joke column or, perhaps, a trifle, the 
merest iota of humor in your write-ups? 
The British restraint we have heard of, 
we find in your publication. 

"The Dome", Richmond Hill High 
School, Richmond Hill, New York. 

Ding Ding Ding Ding! A four-bell 
production ! 

A superior magazine in all respects 
is this issue of your year book. The lay- 
out is artistic, the cover original, the 
poems of great merit, and the essays, 
especially that entitled "On Eating Spa- 
ghetti", very "giggleable". 

I acknowledge these magazines which 
I received with pleasure : "The Sema- 
phore", Stoughton High School; "The 
Chronicle", Preparatory School for 
Boys, Philadelphia, Pa. ; "The Climber", 
West Bridgewater. 

But my time is up, and I hasten to 
wrap up my gimlet eye in tissue paper 
for safe keeping. 

Until next spring, this is your Plym- 
outh High School commentator, Jimmy 
Fuddler, saying, "Goodbye to you — and 
I do mean you!" 



40 



THE PILGRIM 



./]] niiiiiiiiiiiiniiimiiiiiiniiinmminiiiiiiiiimnmiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiciiiiiiiiiiiM 



BELIEVE IT OR NOT ! 




"o iiiiio ci iiniiin iiiiMioiMiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiini [JiiiiiiiniiiE'i niinin i run riiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiuimiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiriimiiimiic; 



THE PILGRIM 



41 



Alumni Notes 



LOOKING BACKWARD 

SHIS is the Roving Reporter, folks, 
speaking to you from the corridor 
of the Memorial Building where the 
Junior Promenade, another gala affair 
of '37, is about to begin. Many celebri- 
ties, among them many of our alumni, 
are arriving, and we may be able to get 
some of them to say a few words to you 
through the microphone. 

Our first celebrity is Dean Beytes. He 
can almost surely be counted upon to 
give to you his idea of Mass. State — that 
is, unless his attitude toward the spoken 
word has changed a great deal. 

"Unaccustomed as I am to public 
speaking, I will tell you that I think a 
freshman's life can be full of strange 
and wondrous experiences." 

It must be that Mass. State has 
changed Dean. He's gone terse and pla- 
titudinous on us. 

Here is a group of last year's gradu- 
ates led by Lucy Mayo and Pauline Viau. 
Lucy and Pauline apparently will not 
trust themselves to the microphone be- 
cause they are hurrying by with averted 
gaze, but it's no secret that they both 
attend Chandler Secretarial School in 
Boston. 

Behind them stroll Jean Whiting and 
Alba Martinelli, both from Bridgewater 
State Teachers College. Alba is most 
willing to say a few words to you, and 
Jean indicates that Alba can very easily 
speak for both of them so — the micro- 
phone is yours, Alba. 

"It certainly seems good to be here, 
and I am pleasantly reminded of the 
Junior Prom of the Class of 1936. There 
will never be another one like that. Since 
we have been attending Bridgewater 
and have been learning the duties of a 
teacher, we can tell you, without exag- 
geration, that the life of a teacher is a 
very serious one. We have learned why 
a teacher very seldom giggles, why she 
frowns at childish pranks, and why she 
looks as if she bore the burdens of the 
world upon her shoulders. Nevertheless 
it is the life we have chosen, and we 
don't regret it — yet." 

But there may be a little difference of 
opinion, for here comes Margaret Dono- 
van, a girl who preferred another school 
in which to get her teacher training. 
Struggles do not seem to have dampened 
her spirits, however. We can only hope 
that these girls will add to the prestige 



of Plymouth High as they seek success 
for themselves. 

Here comes Virginia Wood, tripping 
through the hall in an unladylike fash- 
ion in order to catch up with Lucy Mayo 
and the rest of her friends. She won't 
pause to say a word, and, even if she 
would, she could hardly be coherent be- 
cause she is practically breathless. On 
her way past the microphone she asks 
me to tell you that she is now attending 
Boston University, but she still feels that 
the days in Plymouth High School were 
the happiest. We have heard that Vir- 
ginia would like to transfer to a school 
in the deep south where there is a 
climate more to her liking. 

Our next celebrity is a person who is 
not attending college. Katherine Samp- 
son labors in the office of the Puritan 
Mills, a very capable secretary, I have 
heard. 

Katherine Christie and Arlene Dries 
are too bashful to speak to "their 
public", but they wish me to tell you that 
they did the right thing when they en- 
rolled at Bryant College. It's a good 
thing that Lucy Mayo and Pauline Viau 
have already entered the hall — for the 
Misses Christie and Dries tell me that 
they have decided to become the 
"world's best" stenographers. 

Norma Caswell and Thelma Birnstein 
approach us with the information that 
they are working at the Metropolitan 
Life Insurance Office. Glad the glitter- 
ing World Outside hasn't lured you from 
our midst, girls. 

Well, well, well, here come some of 
our old friends whom we haven't seen 
together for a long time. Marjorie Can- 
toni and Natalie Rubinstein are just ap- 
proaching. Natalie's manner is some- 
what restrained, but Margie is not 
afflicted in the same manner. She's as 
voluble as ever. 

"It's trite but true — Life's no bed of 
roses, but it takes more than a course at 
Simmons to keep two good girls down." 

As enterprising as ever, Margie! 

Here are two guests who believe what 
was good enough for their sisters is 
good enough for them, Barbara Mellor, 
who is attending Wellesley College, and 
Lucy Holmes, who graces the halls of 
Boston University. 

Dorothy Perkins and Harriet Eld- 
ridge now appear to inform us that they 
are public servants — serving the public 
in Smith's News Store. 

Just a minute, folks ! 

Here is our old sports champ, Brad 
Martin, who is — yes, he is — going to say 



42 



THE PILGRIM 




FACULTY 
First Row: Miss Locklin, Miss Rafter, Miss Brown, Mr. Shipman, Mr. Mongan, Mrs. 

Raymond, Miss Judd. 
Second Row: Miss Coombs, Miss Jacques, Miss Humphrey, Miss McNerny, Miss 

Dowling, Miss Kelly, Miss Lang, Miss Carey. 
Third Row: Mr. Packard, Mr. Bagnall, Mr. Smiley, Br. Davis, Mr. Knowlton. 




R 



STUDENTS ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 
First Row: J. Cavicchi. A. Dutton, A. Paoli, P. Johnson, S. Brewster, A. Morelli, M. 

Weild, C. Drew, M. Tracy, M. Bodell, M. Brigida, A. Hey. 
Second Row: Mr. Smiley, Miss Rafter, B. Barnes, R. Tubbs, J. Holmes, B. Drew, V. 

Vinton, Mr. Shipman, F. Scheid, E. Tong, V. Kirkey, H. Longhi, Miss Brown, Mr. 

Mongan. 
Third Row: E. Bradford, A. Galvani, F. Kritzmacher, W. Tedeschi, J. Ryan, R. Sampson, 

P. Godfrey, L. Roberge, L. Briggs, M. Garuti. 



THE PILGRIM 



43 



a few words to you. It's not likely that 
Brad will tell you that he is something 
of a student in English, so I'd better do 
it for him. Keep up the good work, Brad. 

"By the looks of the crowd and the 
decorations, we are going to have a 
swell time tonight, and boy ! am I going 
to be able to enjoy it because, let me tell 
you, spring football is not all play. Still 
I have enough energy left to have a good 
time." 

We are informed that Dorothy 
Rogers, a graduate of the Class of '36, 
is working at the local telephone ex- 
change, while she nurses the hope of at- 
tending Forsythe Dental School next 
year. 

Plymouth High School's debt to the 
Navy was paid when we sent it 
"Scotchie" Strong. He is here tonight 
but, since he is obviously avoiding the 
microphone, we won't press him further. 

A little late, as usual, are Jeanette 
Goodwin and Katherine Lahey. We have 
heard that Jeanette is already scouting 
around to find parents who will send 
their progeny to her to have their teeth 
cleaned after she graduates from 
Forsythe Dental School — which reminds 
us that Theresa Govi is a roommate of 
Jeanette's. Katherine Lahey is conduct- 
ing a similar campaign, only she is 
searching for parents who will send 
their offspring to school to her when she 
graduates from Bridgewater State 
Teachers College — if and when. 

Here comes the great Motor-man, 
Gerald Mayo. Jerry attends General 
Electric and, since he has been at school, 
he has learned how to induce his car to 
operate in a less flamboyant manner. 
Check me if I'm wrong, Jerry. 

Apparently Frances Johnson doesn't 
mind those long train rides into Boston 
each day — or at least they don't sap so 
much of her energy that she can't enjoy 
a dance. 

Well, well, well, if it isn't our former 
P. H. S. orator and his friend. Welcome, 
weary travellers. It must have been a 
tedious process to thumb rides all the 
way from Michigan State University to 
Plymouth. Mr. Caramello, will you 
speak to the interested audience? Excuse 
me, there seems to be a little difficulty 
because Stephen Cappanari is pushing 
his way to the microphone. Well, all 
right, Stephen, if you feel that you can't 
trust the job to Tony. 

"Hello, folks, it sure does feel good to 
be back here in the East. We left Michi- 
gan University at ten o'clock one morn- 
ing and we were able to get a ride with 
Mr. and Mrs. Smith from San Francisco. 



When we got out of their car, along 
came Miss Jones from Utah eager to 
give us a lift. When this delightful (and 
it was delightful, wasn't it, Tony?) ride 
came to an end, we had rather a long 
wait because for an hour and a half no 
car at all passed us. Tony and I started 
to walk, but we hadn't gone very far 
when ..." 

I'm awfully sorry to have to interrupt 
you because, although you have doubt- 
less had a very interesting trip, we must 
get on with our interviews. I am sure 
that some of our classmates already in 
the hall have learned to be good listen- 
ers. 

Walter Deacon, who has recently been 
admitted to Tuft's Medical School, has 
a message for you : "I'm trying to devel- 
op a good bedside manner. I do hope 
you'll like it!" , 

Babe James has established himself as 
an all-round athlete at a Florida Agri- 
cultural School. Not that we expected 
less, Babe. 

And now the breezes of Lake Cham- 
plain have blown Dorothy Holmes home 
to us from Vermont University. We hear 
you've gone literary. How about it, Dot? 

We thought we had some weary 
travellers when Stephen and Tony ap- 
peared, but here is one who should be 
equally as travel-worn! It's Ruth But- 
tner from Oberlin College, Ohio. But 
she looks as charming as ever and quite 
unconquered by the miles. 

The Three Musketeers from Bridge- 
water are just arriving, Shirley Dutton, 
"the little big girl" who leads them on, 
Jeanette Martin, who does the talking 
for the three, and Dorothy Perkins, who 
does the listening for all of them. Well, 
Jeanette. 

"Perhaps you are well enough ac- 
quainted with us to believe that we have 
tried our best, and with more or less suc- 
cess, not to discredit Plymouth High. 
Since I am speaking for the three of us, 
I can tell you that Shirley makes the 
best of managers of the school store. 
Dot has just been chosen secretary of 
her class — and we who know her ex- 
pect her to fill the office with distinc- 
tion." 

Carlo Guidaboni and Robert Martin 
are representing Tuft's with much vol- 
ubility. I could almost believe that they 
get a commission on all those whom they 
can lead to its door, so loudly do they 
sing the praises of that school. 

We catch a glimpse of Francis 
Lavache as he and Viola Petit stroll 
quietly to their seats. 

Florence Armstrong is among the late 

Continued on page 50 



44 



THE PILGRIM 




FOREIGN, 



LANGUAGES 



LE PETIT BAVARD 



RIONS ! 



Nous savons tous que la plupart du 
temps nous sommes diligents ; mais bien 
sur il faut rire aussi — il faut etre heur- 
eux et gais. Et e'est pour cela que nous 
voulions vous offrir cette annee quelque 
chose de different, quelque chose de 
leger, quelque chose qui (nous esperons) 
vous amusera beaucoup. 

Ainsi pour la premiere fois la classe 
de francais de la troisieme annee veut 
que vous fassiez la connaissance de leur 
journal intitule "Le Petit Bavard". 
Vous n'y trouverez rien d'extraordinaire 
mais voyons ce que vous en pensez. 

Voici des incidents qui se sont vrai- 
ment passes: — 



IL SAVAIT CE DONT IL PARLAIT 
Un groupe de garcons de la quatrieme 
annee de notre ecole discutaient ce qu'ils 
allaient porter pour la sortie et la soiree 
de la classe. 

Quelqu'un a dit qu'il serait trop prod- 
igue d'acheter deux complets nouveaux 
pour les deux affaires. 

Voici la reponse d'un des garcons, de 
qui on entend d'autres histoires : 
— II ne faut pas acheter deux complets 
nouveaux. Pour la sortie, nour pouvons 
porter le pantalon blanc et le veston 
noir, et pour la soiree le pantalon noir et 
le veston blanc! Mais ncn! II ne faut pas 
acheter deux complets nouveaux. 

Mary Bodell. 



JONAH ET LA BALEINE 
Un jour dans la classe de latin nous 
parlions des miracles. Le professeur a 
dit que beaucoup de vieux miracles 
pouvaient etre expliques maintenant. 

Par example — dit elle — il y a dans la 
Bible l'histoire de Jonah et la baleine. 
Aujourd' hui, des hommes pensent que 
peut-etre cette histoire est vraie. lis 




disent qu'il est possible que Jonah ait 
vraiment avale la baleine. 

Jean Pearson 



LE GROS COCHON 

Le petit Jean a couru chez lui tres 
vite apres qu'il a vu pour la premiere 
fois un grand cochon mort. Ce cochon 
etait suspendu du plafond dans une 
boucherie. 

Papa! a-t-il crie. Que pensez-vous que 
j'aie vu dans la boucherie? 

Qu'est-ce que vous avez vu? demanda 
le pere un peu irrite. 

J'ai vu un cochon aussi gros que vous ! 
Mary Brigida 

Un jour le professeur a donne a la 
classe des mots a expliquer. Un des mots 
est "huitre". Le prochain jour, quand la 
classe etait arrivee le professeur a com- 
mence avec les mots. II a demande a un 
etudiant a son tour: 

"M. Jones, quest-ce que e'est qu'un 
huitre?" 

"Un huitre," a dit monsieur Jones, 
apres qu'il avait pense un peu, "est un 
petit animal avec un pardessus dur." 

John Kellen. 



CONNAISSEZ-VOUS CES 
PERSONNES:— 

Le professeur qui pose plusieurs ques- 
tions au sujet des problemes phychologi- 
ques? 

Une fille qui fait beaucoup de voyages 
a Elmwood? 

Le plus grand garcon de l'ecole? (et 
le plus maigre aussi) 

Un garcon qui est venu a l'ecole avec 
un oeil poche. 

Un eleve qui joue beaucoup de roles 
dans des drames ; peut-etre sera-t-elle 
une autre Fannie Brice? 

Une futur auteur, artiste, et linguiste? 

Une petite et une grande, deux com- 
pagnes inseparables? 

Un garcon qui cire les souliers pour 
deux francs? 



THE PILGRIM 



45 



Un garcon qui va a New Hampshire 
en et? ou il joue de son violin aux vaches 
et aux cochons? 

Un professeur oui porte toujours de 
l'ccriture sur son dos. 



LISEZ CES BONS PROVERBES 

FRANQAIS:— 
Chien qui aboie ne mord que peu sou- 
vent — John Macafferi 
Paris ne s'est pas fait en un jour 

— Neither were Seniors 
Tout ira a point a qui sait attendre 

— Thus say the faculty 
II n'y a pas de roses sans epines 

— Graduation 

II vaut son pesant d'or 

— LeBaron Briggs 
La parole est d'argent, le silence est 
d'or — Students in Corridor 

Rira bien qui rira le dernier 

— Norman Jones 
Tout ce qui reluit n'est pas or 

— A week's absence 
Vouloir c'est pouvoir 

—To the Class of 1937 
On connait ses amis au besoin 

— Translating a French passage 



VOICI DES LIVRES FRANCAS QUI 
PEUVENT VOUS INTERESSES :— 
Les Miserables (Hugo) 

— Third year French students 
A Cheval (De Maupassant) 

Apparatus day in the "gym" 
Une Vendetta (De Maupassant) 

— Over graduation partners 
Decouverte (De Maupassant) 

— Copying some one's home lesson 
La Chute des Anges , 

— LeBaron Briggs failing 
Le Malade Imaginaire (Moliere) 

— Excuse for being absent 
Les Femmes Savantes (moliere) 

— Sophomore girls 
Les Trois Mousquetaires (Dumas) 

— Fabri, Jones, and Kellen 
La Question d'argent (Dumas Fils) 

— Class dues 
Bataille de Dames (Scribe) 
— At the mirrors in the girl's room 



SAVEZ-VOUS CES CHANSONS 

FRANCAIS? 
La Marguerite — Mary Weild 

Le Chant du depart — Class Song 
Marche des Rois 

— Reception and Grand March 




INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE CLUB 
First Row: A. Bittinger, M. Carvalho, J. Santos, M. Bodell, F. Cannucci, Miss Carey, 

M. Baker, E. Shwom, E. Anderson, A. Riley, J. Beaver, K. Leonardi. 
Second Row: R. Tubbs. R. Lanman, R. Silva, A. Beaman, M. Edes, P. Reinhardt. J. 

Holmes, E. McEwen, B. Peterson, B. Studley, F. Mulcahy, M. Pascoe, A. Pederzani, P. 

Douglas, D. Bodell, J. Cadorette. 
Third Row: R. Grant, A. Govi, C. Addyman, B. Coggeshall, R. Holtz, B. Harlow, F. 

Brown, S. Goldsmith, B. Barnes, I. Marvelli, A. Stein, E. Chadwick. 



AG 



THE PILGRIM 



On entend partout 

— That one of our teachers is going to 

leave us 

La Parisienne — Ellen Shaw 

lis Etaient Quatre — J. Ryan; 

R. Sampson; A. Morelli; M. Montimag- 
gi; (History 3 C) 

Aupres de ma blonde 

—Ruth Flagg 



Gentille Bateliere 
Jour de lumiere 
J'ai deux amours 



— Mary Brigida 

-Graduation Day 

— Mary Curtin 



JE ME DEMANDE SI:— 

Thelma Bentley est si petite parce 
(lu'elle a ete ecrasee quand elle etait un 
enfant. 

Jones eessera jamais de grommeler et 
de rougir. 

Un etranger dans le refectoire pense- 
rait qu'il est dans une bataille. 

Le bruit dans les corridors pourrait 
etre pire. 

Les professeurs etaient jamais comme 
les eleves. 



SAVEZ-VOUS QUE:— 

S. A. S. veut dire Siecles Avant Succes 
en francais? 

Nous sommes un peu irlandais? Les 
couleurs de notre classe sont le vert et 
le blanc. 

Deux garcons pensent que le Noel est 
encore ici? Avez-vous remarque les 
chemises rouges et les cravates vertes? 

La solution du grand mystere? Qu'est- 
ce qui est arrive aux sandwichs de Car- 
bone? 

Nous sommes dans une nouvelle ecole? 
Eh bien, souvenez-vous en! 



DAME RUMOR 

3BAME Rumor is an evil vulture gorg- 
ing herself on the carrion of innuen- 
dos and exaggerations. This bird of ill- 
omen may be pictured as having as 
many prying eyes as there are feathers 
on her body and just as many clacking 
tongues, prating mouths, and straining 
ears. She hovers over great cities, peer- 
ing and prying into the lives of innocent 
people. One small grain of rumor is tak- 
en by this vile bird and, as she shrieks 
and squawks the news into the ears of 
men, the grain of truth, in passing from 
mouth to mouth, becomes larger and 
larger, like a snowball gathering weight 
as it rolls. Finally the ball of rumor 
swells to such proportions that it is as 
an avalanche of lies thundering down to 



obliterate the subjects of the cruel 
gossip. 

Dame Rumor is cunning in her meth- 
ods. She insinuates a drop of truth and 
an innuendo into the ears of man. Man 
accomplishes the rest with old Dame 
Rumor always at his elbow to prompt 
him. The horrid bird could not commit 
her heinous crime without the aid of 
man. Phyllis Johnson '37 



O TEMPORA! O MORES! 

The following is a student's concep- 
tion of the meaning of Latin, 
late — not on time 
cur — dog, anything lowly 
loco — crazy 
post — a stick of wood 
miles — measures of distance 
mare — kind of horse 
miser — one who hoards money 
lux — brand of soap 
mane — the hair on a horse's neck 
nix — slang for no 



SOLID MAHOGANY 
'There is not another boy in town as 

clever as my Charles!" 
'Go on ; how is that?" 
'Well, look at those two chairs. My 

Charles made them all out of his own 

head and he has enough wood left to 

make an armchair!" 



Sunday morning in a drug store — 
"Can you give me change for a dime, 

please?" 
Druggist — "Certainly, and I hope you 

enjoy the sermon." 



Angry Customer — "Hey, I've found a 

tack in this doughnut." 
Waiter — " Why, the ambitious little 

thing! It must think it's a tire!" 



Student — "We have come to bury 

Caesar, not to praise him." 
Prof.— "Who said that?" 
Student — "Some undertaker." 



"There's a man outside who wants to 
know if any of the patients have 
escaped lately." 

Director of the asylum — "Why does he 
ask?" 

Attendant — "He says some one has run 
away with his wife." 



A little fellow left in charge of his tiny 
brother called out, "Mother, won't you 
please speak to baby? He's sitting on 
the fly paper and there's a lot of flies 
waiting to get on." 



THE PILGRIM 



47 




IN THE HUDDLE 

39 UE to the spring training and the 
*** coaching ability of Mr. Knowlton and 
Mr. Romano, the football team got off 
to a good start early in September. The 
team won five games and lost three. 
There were no ties, which is an unusual 
circumstance in football. 

The winning of the first game over 
Hingham seemed to give the boys en- 
couragement, and led them on to a more 
successful season. However, the second 
game was lost to Abington, a more 
powerful team. Not discouraged, the 
team retaliated with four consecutive 
victories. Because of Plymouth's lack of 
weight, Weymouth won the next game 
and, handicapped by the injury of Cap- 
tain Giammarco, the only injury of the 
season, the team lost its last game to 
Coyle. 

At the end of this game the following 
members had played the last time for 
Plymouth High School : Captain Giam- 
marco, Carbone, Barbieri, Tassanari, 
Montimaggi, Govoni, Tong, and Medei- 
ros. 

However, with Reggini, Wright, 
James, Leonardi, Fratus, and Captain 
Wayne Allen returning, the prospects 
for next year are bright. 



Captain G. Ferazzi, T. Giammarco, N. 
Carbone, D. Harlow, and R. Webber. 

Edward Tong 



UNDER THE BASKET 

MLYMOUTH'S basketball season was 
ir disastrous as far as victories were 
concerned. The schedule resulted in five 
victories as against twelve defeats. How- 
ever, this does not determine the quality 
of the team, for many of the games were 
lost in the final quarter. 

Coach Ingraham was handicapped be- 
cause of the lack of experienced ma- 
terial, for only three members of last 
year's squad answered the basketball 
call. 

The team was shut out of the South 
Shore Tournament, held at the Brockton 
Y. M. C. A., in an overtime period 
against the Oliver Ames High School of 
North Easton. 

Because most of the players are re- 
turning, the prospects for next year are 
good. 

The players lost by graduation are: 



WITH THE ATHLETES 

Telio Giammarco 

The Slowest Dresser 
Tony Govoni 

Candidate for a debating team 
Rie:o Tassanari 

Practical joker of the team 
Fred Barbieri 

The twin that is a year behind the 
other half 
Mario Montimaggi 

What the well-dressed player should 
wear 
Nick Carbone 

The Dreamer (Another Columbus, 
maybe) 
Wayne Allen 

Laziest man this side of the canal 
Tony Medeiros 

Potential Casanova on the squad 
Bev James 

Not a flash in the pan 
Jimmy Caramello 

The One-Man Gang 
Joe Farina 

One-Man Gang's Trainer 
Bucky Freeman 

Modern Rip Van Winkle 
Ernie Leonardi 

Whose heart is in Bridgewater 
Mario Regini 

The Galloping Ghost 
Gabe Ferazzi 

It's the Irish he's after ! 
Dick Harlow 

Wishes he was a Soph 
Amedeo Galvani 

Professional heart-breaker 
Wilfred Cohen 

The man who manages 
Milton Petit 

Goldilocks 
Leo Roberge 

Clamdigger de luxe 
Robert Potts 

The Shy Newcomer 
Davy Furtado 

The Potent Pygmy 
Tom Ruggiero 

Fred Aataire of the squad 



48 



THE PILGRIM 



Henry Bastoni 

Very fastidious about his hair 
Howard Smith 

Sauerkraut above all! (It's the Germ 
in him) 
Tommy Prentice 

Wit when Wit is needed 
Roy Webber 

Slicker Dan 
Bunny Petit 

Growing pains 
Alan Morelli 

Robert Taylor's competitor 
Joe Govoni 

The Dashing Halfback (East is West) 
Sonino Secondo 

One-Punch Secondo 
William De Salvatore 

Axle grease for his joints 
Eddie Wright 

Dinner for one, please, James 
Allen Cappella 

The Ice-Man 



Joseph Caton 

Leader of the swamp blockers 
Robert Emond 

Lefty of the Big League 
George Lemoine 

Just One Kiki 
Eddie Tong 

The Dear Slayer 
Martin Brewster 

The Trapper 
George Fratus 

Mackerel 
Eddie Green 

Holdout 
George Pearson 

Swedish All-Scholastic 
Angelo Brigida 

Perseverance wins 
Albert Christani 

Peppy 
Walter Motta 

Wally "Berger" 

G. Ferazzi '37 







FOOTBALL TEAM 
First Row: A. Medeiros, E. Leonardi, J. Caramello, N. Carbone, W. Allen, F. Barbieri, 

A. Tassinari. 
Second Row: Coach Knowlton, E. Wright, E. Tong, M. Regini, M. Montlmaggi, T. 

Govoni, T. Giammarco, L. Roberge, B. James, Coach Romano. 
Third Row: T. Prentice, J. Darsch, M. Brewster, J. Silvia, G. Fratus, D. Furtado, S. 

Secondo. 
Fourth Row: J. Govoni, R. Silva, W. Kenny, E. Hamblin, G. Freeman, D. McDonald, H. 

Malaguti, S. Shwom. 
Fifth Row: L. Taddia, C. Omgenito, J. Farina, G. Pearson, John St. George, J. Govoni, 

L. Poluzzi. 



"Have you anything to say, prisoner, be- 
fore I pass sentence?" asked the 
judge, 

"No, your Honor — except that it takes 
very little to please me." 



First visitor — "My dear, these cakes are 

as hard as stones!" 
Second visitor — "I know. Didn't you 

hear her say, 'Take your pick,' when 

she handed them out?" 



THE PILGRIM 



49 




BASKETBALL SQUAD 
First Row: B. James, M. Regini, A. Galvani, G. Ferazzi, T. Giammarco. 
Second Row: Coach Knowlton, G. Freeman, N. Carbone, L. Roberge, R. Potts, J. Farina, 
R. Harlow, W. Cohen. 




BOYS' BASEBALL TEAM 
First Row: G. Freeman, G. Ferazzi, D. Furtado, B Petit, M. Petit, F. Shea, M. Soleri, 

M. Regini. 
Second Row: G. Fratus, R. Emond, J. Cavicchi, J. Darsch, J. Caton, A. Giovennetti, W. 

Allen, R. Tassanari. 
Third Row: D. Harlow, A. Darsch, H. Courtney, D. Fratus, R. Sampson, J. Demas, A. 

Cristani, R. Hughes, Coach Knowlton. 



50 



THE PILGRIM 



STICKWORK 

7jT HE hockey season started aus- 
piciously with our 2-1 victory over 
Scituate. Our next game with Marsh- 
field, an excellent team and our greatest 
rival, could never be construed as a vic- 
tory for our side. When we were visited 
by the Hyannis hockey team, our feel- 
ings were soothed by a victory of 2-0, 
but, when we encountered them on their 
home grounds, we were defeated by the 
score of 1-0. These were only a few of the 
outstanding games played by the high 
school this season. Our team was, how- 
ever, successful in winning five games, 
tying two, and losing two. 

It will be necessary to build a new 
team next year as a large number of 
the squad will graduate. However, Mrs. 
Garvin feels that she has good material 
to work with, and we wish her the 
greatest success next season. 

Although we were not so fortunate as 
to go through a season undefeated, as 
we did last year, we were still able to 
appreciate the banquet given in honor 
of the hockey and football teams. 

The fine snowing of the first team was 
made possible through the leadership 
of Capt. Alice Wood and the following 
players: 

Carol Handy, L. W. ; Mary Brigida, L. 
I. ; Mar jorie Tracy, C. F. ; Jean Pearson, 
R. I.;Tillie Bussolari, R. W. ; Capt. Alice 
Wood, L. H.; Cynthia Drew, C. H.; 
Betsy Drew, R. H. ; Phyllis Johnson, L. 
F. B.; Mary Weild, R. F. B. ; Marion 
Lahey, Goal. 

While we have enjoyed a successful 
season, we realize only too well the 
credit belongs largely to Mrs. Garvin 
for her thorough coaching. 



SINK THAT SHOT 

TT\ HE success of the team this year was 
due to a great extent to the facilities 
provided by our new gymnasium. Our 
first game was played at Rockland, and 
we are glad to report a 24 — 12 victory. 
We were very much pleased to win our 
next game, the first one played in the 
new gymnasium. When we visited Mid- 
dleboro, however, we were shamefully 
defeated by the score of 7 — 21, but are 
proud to say we avenged ourselves when 
the Middleboro girls came here, for 
we won by the score of 16 — 13. Our last 
game at Whitman was a victory for our 
opponents as we lost 22 — 23. 

The girls played seven games, lost 
two, and won five. The players who con- 
tributed to this record were: C. Drew, 
Captain; P. Lovell, P. Johnson, as for- 



wards; M. Curtin, A. Wood, M. Brigida 
as guards. 

The second team also deserves much 
credit, for it lost only one of the six 
games played. These girls were: M. 
Tracy, Capt. ; B. Drew and B. Harlow as 
forwards; M. Weild, V. Weston, and T. 
Bussolari as guards. 
,, Although Mrs. Garvin is losing all her 
first team through graduation, we feel 
that the Plymouth High School girls 
will continue to turn in good records 
under her excellent supervision. 

C. Drew 



Continued from page 43 

arrivals. Florence has just been elected 
Secretary of International Relations at 
New Hampshire University, which, as 
you may judge from the length of her 
title, is a very great honor. It is not diffi- 
cult for us in Plymouth High School to 
realize why we should be proud of 
Florence. 

And now, since the orchestra has 
started to play, I must fold my "tents 
like the Arabs and as silently steal 
away." Mary Curtin '37 



TO WINTER 

O Winter! where thy icy blast, 

Thy snow-capped hills, 

Thy gleaming parapets of snow, 

Thy tracery and lace? 

Hast thou, perchance, become a myth? 

A flash of fancy? 

Or hast thou some sinister design 

To force upon us? 

When Nature bids the blossoms bud 

And leaves turn green, 

Wilt thou, relentless , smite 

The life within? 

Fourscore days and nine thou hast 

To rule the earth. 

Do not linger at our gate. 

We welcome spring! 

Kathleen Farnell '30 



Yesterday we heard positively the 
last one on our friend, the absent- 
minded professor. He slammed his wife 
and kissed the door. 

"Now then, what should a polite little 
boy say to a lady who has given him a 
penny for carrying her parcels?" 

"I am too polite to say it, madam!" 

As a steamer was leaving the harbor 
of Athens, a well-dressed young passen- 
ger approached the captain and, point- 
ing to the distant hills, inquired. "What 
is that white stuff on the hills, Cap- 
tain?" 

"That is snow, madam," replied the 
captain. 

"Well," remarked the lady, "I thought 
so myself, but a gentleman told me it 
was Greece." 



THE PILGRIM 



51 




HOCKEY TEAM 
First Row: J. Pearson, C. Handv, P. Johnson, M. Weild, A. Wood, M. Tracy, C. Drew, 

B. Drew, M. Lahey, T. Bussolari. 
Second Row: A. Schreiber, B. Barnes, E. Coleman, J. Holmes, P. Lovell, J. Hall, E. Lee, 

B. Harlow, C. Whiting A. Rossetti. 
Third Row: C. Addyman, I. Albertini, H. Belcher, Mrs. Garvin, E. McEwen, L. Long- 

inotti, I. Murphey, E. Fascioli. 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 
First Row: M. Curtin, P. Johnson, P. Lovell, C. Drew, T. Bussolari, A. Wood. 
Second Row: B. Harlow, V. Weston, B. Barnes, E. Coleman, Mrs. Gai'vin, B. Drew, 
M. Lahey, J. Holmes, M. Weild, M. Tracy. 



52 



THE PILGRIM 




CHEER LEADERS 
First Row: Charlotte Whiting, Marjorie Tracy. 
Second Row: Harold Morelli, Henry Bastoni, Vernon 
Kirkey. 





KEY TO FACULTY 




BABY PICTURES 


1. 


Miss Brown 


2. 


Miss Humphrey 


o 


Mr. Knowlton 


4. 


Miss Lang 


5. 


Mrs. Garvin 


6. 


Miss Kelly 


7. 


Miss Locklin 


8. 


Miss McNerny 


9. 


Mrs. Raymond 


10. 


Mr. Smiley 


11. 


Mr. Shipman 



"I hear that Jones left everything he 

had to an orphan asylum." 
"Is that so? What did he leave?" 
"Twelve children." 
"I'd like to get a lawnmower." 
"I'm sorry, sir, but we haven't any." 
"Well, this is a fine drugstore!" 

Restaurant Manager (to orchestra con- 
ductor) — "I wish you'd display a little 
more tact in choosing the music. We've 
got the National Association of Um- 
brella Manufacturers here this even- 
ing, and you've just played Tt Ain't 
Gonna Rain No More' !" 



The editors wish to thank Miss 
Judd and her typists for assistance in 
the preparation of copy for "The 
Pilgrim." 



MUSIC — STILL A CAREER! 

A fact as well as a title! — graphic proof of 
which can be read from the experience of one 
of this June's graduates of the New England 
Consei-vatory of Music. A young man of both 
fine character and splendid attainments, he had 
been advised by the Placement Bureau of the 
Conservatory to write to an extensive list of 
schools. It took more than a few polite negative 
replies to deter him from his quest. Finally 
there came the letter whose tone was favorable. 
An interview was arranged; later in the week 
the superintendent visited the classes in which 
the candidate was engaged in practice teaching 
(his field was public school music) — with the 
result that the youthful candidate was ap- 
pointed to an excellent position in the schools 
of a sizeable New England city — and, one is 
happy to add, a substantial beginning salary. 

While it cannot be denied that a few chang- 
ing circumstances in the world of music have 
brought discouragements to workers in this 
field, opportunities for the really talented and 
well trained have undoubtedly widened. Most 
schools have enlarged and improved their music- 
departments — providing additional positions 
for music teachers. The same has held true in 
private schools; formerly many private schools 
depended upon the part-time services of local 
teachers, but within the past few years, they 
have engaged musicians as important additions 
to their full-time faculties. Growth of music- 
departments in American colleges has defin- 
itely made the field of college music teaching 
more attractive. 

Generally improved standards of music — in 
which it cannot be denied that the radio has 
played an important part — have increased the 
demand for capable private instructors. Within 
the past few years piano manufacturers have 
experienced phenomenal growth in sales. It is 
obvious that these instruments are being 
bouerht to be played upon — and those who learn 
to play them must be taught. 

In all-around musical activity, many fresh 
opportunities have made themselves felt. The 
radio — to mention it again — has demanded the 
services of skillful, well-schooled performers. 
The larger stations retain trained orchestral 
performers as part of their regular staffs. 
Growth of municipal musical activity of one 
sort and another has afforded many young 
musicians ample opportunities of winning a 
livelihood in a field in which they feel they 
belong. 

There is every reason to hope for steadily 
increasing opportunities for the musician. Pro- 
vided a student possesses the requisite amount 
of talent and aptitude, and (a most important 
factor) makes sure of obtaining his musical 
education in an institution whose standards are 
unquestioned and unouestionable, his hope for 
future success should be eaual to those he 
mig-ht form in the contemplation of other fields 
of endeavor. 

Doctor — "Deeo breathing kills bacteria. 
Patient — "But how can I make them 
breathe deeply. 



THE PILGRIM 



53 



Prestige and Your Future 

In Music or Dramatics 



Throughout seventy years students have come from all parts of the* 
civilized world to obtain musical training in Boston. As trained musicians 
they have gone forth to success as soloists, operatic stars, teachers, con- 
ductors and composers. Their accomplishments have built World-Wide 
Prestige for graduates of — 

IVewtngland , 
Conservatory 

OF MUSIC 



Director 
Wallace Goodrich 



Our students work in an environment 
which stimulates accomplishment. The 
instruction given combines those pro- 
portions of theory, practice and public 
experience found most helpful in 70 
years of musical education. 



Dean of Vacuity 
Frederick S. Converse 



Advanced students are offered mem- 
bership in the Conservatory Symphony 
Orchestra or soloist appearances. 
Dramatic students participate in a 
Full Season of Drama programs. All 
benefit from an excellent faculty and 
unusual facilities. 



71st Year Begins September 16 

Students received for study of Single Subjects 

Recognized Diplomas and Collegiate Degrees Conferred. 

If you possess talents worth developing for a profession or an avoca- 
tion you should obtain the advantages of the training at New England 
Conservatory of Music, acknowledged as a leader since 1867, in prep- 
aration for such positions as: Soloist, Ensemble Player, Orchestra 
Member, Teacher, Opera Singer, Composer, Conductor, Actor, Dancer, 
Radio Performer or Announcer, Little Theatre Director, etc. Our 
training prepares you and our prestige aids you. Visit the school for 
a personal interview or write to the Secretary for a complete, illus- 
trated Catalog. 

Fill out and mail us this coupon and receive Free Tickets to Recitals. 



1 — 1 Please put my name on your mailing list for 
Free Tickets to Conservatory concerts and recitals. 


Send this Coupon 


or a letter to 


1 — 1 Please send Catalog of Courses. 


"The Secretary" 




NEW ENGLAND 




CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 








I am interested in studying 


Huntington Ave., 


I will graduate from High School in 19 


Boston, Mass. 



54 THE PILGRIM 



The Advantage 
is yours, too! 



You are entering the stream which will carry you 
into a modern, efficient streamlined world of activ- 
ity. 

Your advantages are greater than your prede- 
cessor. 

You are better equipped to cope with the diversi- 
fied problems which you will meet. 

You will have placed in your hands, better and 
more efficient tools with which to work. 

As you use these new tools you will begin to real- 
ize that wherever you turn and whatever you do 
your efficiency and achievement will be higher if 
you use the world's greatest servants, Gas and Elec- 
tricity. 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY ELECTRIC CO. 
PLYMOUTH GAS LIGHT CO. 



THE PILGRIM 



55 



IT HAS BEEN OUR GREAT PLEASURE TO SERVE 

BOTH THE HIGH AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 
DURING THE SCHOOL YEARS FROM 1929 TO 1937 



LAHEY'S 



High Quality Ice Cream 



Compliments of 

CLOUGH'S MARKET 

84 Summer Street Plymouth 



Compliments of 

CEASAR'S 

DINE AND DANCE 

Route 3 Manomet 

Home Cooked Food 




56 



THE PILGRIM 




GIRLS' BASEBALL TEAM 
First. Row: M. Curtin, P. Johnson, P. Lovell, C. Drew, B. Drew, V. Weston, T. Bussolari, 

M. Tracy, B. Harlow. 
Second Row: E. Fascioli, A. Beaman, E. Coleman, E. McEwen, M. Lahey, J. Holmes, 

A. Shreiber, C. Whiting, A. Wood. 
Third Row: A. Rossetti, R. Sampson, B. Barnes, H. Belcher, C. Handy, Mrs. Garvin, M. 

Cingolani, J. Pearson, I. Albertini, M. Raymond, M. Fernandes. 



WHITE HORSE PLAYLAND 

Shuffle Board 
Dancing 

"KELLER'S" 



Compliments of 
DANFORTH'S 

"Where Quality Prevails" 



BORZAN BEAUTY SALON 



Permanents 
End Permanents 



#2.98 
#1.98 



Hair Cuts, Finger Waves, Manicure, Eyebrows and Hair Trimming 

Priced at 25c 

MISSES BORSARI AND ZANDI 
20 North Spooner Street NORTH PLYMOUTH 

Call Miss Zandi 



THE PILGRIM 



57 



Business Training 



59th year begins 
in September 



PLACEMENT 
Service Free 
to Graduates 

2021 employment 
calls received dur- 
ing the past year- 



For Young Men and Women 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

ACCOUNTING EXECUTIVE SECRETARIAL 

SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING 

BUSINESS AND FINISHING COURSES 




Write or telephone for 

Day or Evening 

Catalog 



One and Tiro- Year Programs. Previous commercial 
training not required for entrance. Leading colleges 
represented in attendance. Students from different states 

Burdett College 

156 STUART STREET, BOSTON 
Telephone HANcock 6300 



GRADUATION 



SENIORS 



You'll want to look your best when you step up to receive your diploma, 
at that great event — Graduation 

WE HAVE THE SUITS, TIES, SHIRTS, AND SHOES THAT WILL GIVE YOU THE 

WELL-DRESSED APPEARANCE THAT YOU DESIRE. VISIT OUR STORE 

AND LET US ASSIST YOU IN MAKING YOUR SELECTIONS. 

PURITAN CLOTHING COMPANY 



56 MAIN STREET 



"Home of Dependability" 
Tel. 730-731 



PLYMOUTH 



G RAD EAlCE CREAM 



REGISTERED TRADE MARK 

MADE BY 



DUTCHLAND FARMS 



EST. 1897 



INC 

BROCKTON, MASS. 



jCc*4 Q*r to< 7DzuGcJ\jUwic? / 



ROUTE 3 — 91 MAIN ST., 



KINGSTON, MASS. 



58 



THE PILGRIM 1 



JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Your Hardware Store for 112 Years 

PAINTS, HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES, 

PLUMBING, HEATING and SHEET METAL WORK 

Tel. 283 Plymouth 



COUNTY AUTO SUPPLY, Inc. 

GAS. OIL and ACCESSORIES 
Main St. Ext. Plymouth, Mass. 

Compliments of 
WINSOR SAVERY 



Telephone 1187-W 

Jim's Lunch 8C Restaurant 

REGULAR DINNERS 

A LA CARTE SERVICE 

SHORE DINNERS OUR SPECIALTY 

5 and 7 Main Street Plymouth, Mass. 



"We put New Life in Old Shoes" 
PLYMOUTH SHOE HOSPITAL 

63 V 2 Main St. Plymouth, Mass. 

Compliments of 
A FRIEND 

HAROLD VOLTA 

and His Orchestra 
Plymouth Tel. 840 



STYLE Plus QUALITY 

Two Very Importante Words in Our New Line of Sport Clothes for Summer 

WASH SLACKS— SPORT SHIRTS— SWEATERS- 
NOVELTY HOSE 

In Our New Style Line You Will Find Something Different 
A K ents for ROSTONIAN SHOES 

MORSE & SHERMAN 

WM. J. SHARKEY 



Court Street 



Plymouth 



THE PILGRIM 



59 



1 

C. PAUL 

For Your Shoes and Repairing 
Honest Values and Dependable Service 


Relief for Acid Stomach j 

BISMA - REX 1 

Four Action Antacid Powder 
Neutralizes Acidity — Removes Gas — | 
Soothes Stomach — Assists Digestion 

Big Bottle 50c 
SAVE with SAFETY at 

COOPER DRUG COMPANY ! 
BEMIS DRUG COMPANY ! 

"The 6 Busy REX ALL Stores" 1 
ABINGTON— NO. ABINGTON— j 
ROCKLAND 
"In Plymouth it's Cooper's" 1 


52 Court St. Plymouth 


BEDARD'S 

Hat-Cleaning and Shoe Shine Parlor 

"We make new hats out of old ones" 
11 Main St. Plymouth, Mass. 


PLYMOUTH BAKING CO. ! 

BREAD, PIES, and CAKES 

Wholesale and Retail 

20 Market St. Tel. 225-M Plymouth | 


Compliments of 
OLD COLONY LAUNDRY 

of Plymouth 
Complete Laundry Service 


WOOD'S FISH MARKET \ 

The Ocean's Best 


Coat, Apron, Towel Supply 
Tel. Plymouth 272 


Main St. Extension Phone 261 1 


ENNA JETTICK SHOES FOR LADIES 
TOMBOY SHOES FOR CHILDREN 

EDDIE'S SHOE SYSTEM 

18 Main St. EDWARD HAND, Mgr. 


Compliments of I 
GAMBINFS j 


PLYMOUTH 8c BROCKTON 
STREET RAILWAY CO. 


CURRIER'S j 

ICE CREAM 
Kemp's Candies and Nuts 


Air Conditioned Buses 
Sandwich St., Plymouth 


Luncheon and Home Made Pastries 
63 Main Street Plymouth 


Compliments of 
RICHARD'S SHOE REBUILDER 


Compliments of 1 
THOMAS F. RYAN 

DRUGS | 



60 



THE PILGRIM 



WHEN THERE IS BETTER WORK DONE 
WE WILL DO IT 

JOHN H. GOVI 

TAILOR 



Main Street 



Plymouth 



Compliments of 
EARL W. GOODING 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 



Compliments of 
DR. E. HAROLD DONOVAN 



WM. J. BERG 

MEN'S SHOP 

Clothing and Furnishings 

42 Court St. Plymouth 



Compliments of 



MITCHELL - THOMAS CO., Inc. 

Plymouth's Leading Furniture Store 
OPPOSITE PILGRIM HALL 



Compliments of 
J. F. TAYLOR 

DENTIST 



Compliments of 

ERNEST C. DUNHAM'S 

AMOCO 

SERVICE STATION 
Main St. Ext. Plymouth 



Compliments of 
DR. FRANK L. BAILEY 

OPTOMETRIST 
Russell Bldg. Plymouth 

Compliments of 
SCHWOM BROS. 



Compliments of 



BUTTOER 9 § 



THE PILGRIM 



61 



LOREN MURCHISON 8c CO. Inc. 

AMERICAS FINEST SCHOOL JEWELERS 
CLASS RINGS, CLASS PINS, MEDALS AND TROPHIES 

Official Jewelers to Classes of '36, '37, '38 Plymouth High School 
528 Park Sq. Bldg., Boston, Mass. 

Represented by Frank A. Fowler 



GRIFFITH 

Jbr Economical Transportation 




SALES 
120 Sandwich St. 



SERVICE 
Tel. 802 



STEVENS THE FLORIST 

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Member of The Florist Telegraph Delivery Association 

9 COURT STREET 



62 



THE PILGRIM 



Bryant Collega 

Providence, Rhode Island 

Beautifully located on campus in 
exclusive residential district, this out- 
standing college offers exceptional two- 
year degree courses in Business Admin- 
istration, Accountancy, Finance, and 
Executive Secretarial Training. Also 
1-year Intensive Secretarial Courses. 
Co-ed. Effective Placement Service. 
Splendid college buildings. Gym. Dor- 
mitories. 75th year begins September 
8, 1937. Summer Session begins July 6. 
A new 4-year Commercial Teacher 
Training Course approved by the State 
Director of FHucation of Rhode Island, 
will also begin in Sep- 
tember. Catalog and 
View Book mailed free 
upon request. Address 
Director of Admissions, 
Providence, Rhode 
"* Island. 




PROTECTS THAT ORANGE JUICE FLAVOR 

DRINK 

ORANGE 
KIST 



MADE WITH REAL JUICE 

FROM TREE-RIPENED VALENCIA ORANGES 
Rich ]uice flavor — protected, sealed carbon- 
ation — assurance of freshness, sanitation and 
wholesomeness. 

Choose your favorite in Kist Beverages — 
Strawberry Kjst, Lemon Kist, Lime Kist, 
Root Beer Kist, and many others. Ask your 
lealer — look for the Kist Sign on his store. 



CcUunmated. 
Scaled. 



to protect the flavor 



to insure freshness 
PLYMOUTH BOTTLING WORKS, Inc. 
121 Sandwich St., Plymouth Tel. 1623-W 




Wilfred Training 



Sound, proven principles are correctly in- 
terpreted and applied by our master instruc- 
tors in the individual training of our students. 
Spacious, modern classrooms are thoroughly 
equipped for fundamental and practical train- 
ing in every phase of Beauty Culture. 

A personal visit will convince you that 
WILFRED is the ideal practical school of 
Beauty Culture. Modest rates — easy terms. 
Day, evening classes. Investigate NOW! Re- 
quest Booklet E 24 

ILFRED ACADEMY 



of Hair and Beauty Culture 



492 Boylston Street 



Boston, Mass. 



Kenmore 7286 



THE PILGRIM 



63 




Now Showing 
Fashions Newest in 



Graduation and Reception 

GO IV N S 



AT 36—38 COURT STREET 



CUISINE UNEXCELLED 
PRICES MODERATE 

THE SILVER LEAF CAFE 

Phone 430 



M> Court Street 



Plymouth, Mass. 



6 Congress Sports Wear 
• Mallory Hats 

• Whitney Shirts 

# Stoneface Clothes 
PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 

WM. CAVICCHI, Prop. 
"Quality Merchandise at Lowest Prices" 

18 Main St. Tel. 341 



DO YOU WANT OUR 

New Illustrated Catalog of Book Bargains 

listing many books formerly published at $2.00 to $17.50 
now sold at 59c to $1.98 ? 

We have these books in stock. See them in our Show 
Windows and on our Book Counters. 

Ask or write for this Handsome New Descriptive Catalog— ^ ?U F&EE. 

Burbank's Pilgrim Bookshop 

Come in and Browse Around 
19 and 21 Court Street Plymouth 



H. A. BRADFORD 

Distributor for 
S. S. Pierce Specialties 
Birdseye Frosted Foods 

1 Warren Ave. Tel. 1298-W 



PRISCILLA CLEANSERS 
Cleansing Dyeing Pressing 



Wain Street Tel. 165-W Plymouth 



64 



THE PILGRIM 



TRAIN FOR BUSINESS 
BROCKTON BUSINESS COLLEGE 

Why? Because it presents bigger and better opportunities today than all other pro- 
fessions combined. Because business is constantly in need of new blood to replace execu- 
tives who are either retiring or advancing to higher positions. Because the steady drive 
of all arts and sciences toward business has made business not only a profession, 
but the outstanding one as well. 

You must be able to say to an employer, "I am qualified" and he must see real value 
for his money before he will employ you. Today the demand is for those who can do 
'"lie tilings well; therefore, you must have this qualification — and Specialized Train- 
ing" rS- $he answer. We loan you a typewriter for home practice free. 

Summer School begins July 12. 

Day School Fall Term begins Sept. 7 

Night School begins Sept. 21. 



C. W. JONES, Pres. 



224 Main Street 



Telephone 635 



Compliments of 

CAPPANNARI BROS. 



VEOR THE GRADUATION GIFT 
Give A Fine Watch or Ring 

We carry a complete line of Nationally Advertised Watches: BULOVA, 
BENRUS, ELGIN, GRUEN, HAMILTON, WALTHAM. 

Friendship and Birthstone Rings; Sheaffer Pen and Pencil Sets; Um- 
brellas; Overnight Cases; Tie and Collar Sets; Bill Folds; Toilet Sets, 3 
pieces to 20. 

Pay as Little as 50c A Week 




-JEWEUWYX /COMPANY 



Visit Our 
OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

DR. E. P. JEWETT, Reg. 
Optometrist in Charge 



THE PILGRIM 



65 



TUTORING 


WALK-OVER SHOE STORE 


Members of P. H. S. faculty remain- 


65 Main Street, Plymouth 


ing in Plymouth for the summer are 




f WALK-OVER SHOES 
| BASS MOCCASINS 


prepared to tutor in many high school 


Agents for 


) KAMP TRAMPS 
I DOUGLAS SHOES 


subjects. 




j GOODRICH LINE 
of Sneakers and Rubbers 


Call Mr. Wayne M. Shipman, Princi- 




D. W. BESSE 


pal, for further information. 




Prop. 



Compliments of 

SHERMAN'S 



Plymouth 



North Plymouth 



FIRST NATIONAL STORES 



25 Main Street, Plymouth 



O. R. Sayre 



W. G. Wood 



Compliments of 

BANDER'S 

Plymouth's Most Popular 
Women's Shop 

54 Main St. Tel. 38 Plymouth 



BALBONI'S DRUG STORE 

319 Court St., North Plymouth 

Prescriptions Filled Accurately 

Tel. 1251 Free Delivery 

BENJAMIN D. LORING 

DIAMONDS WATCHES- JEWELRY 
SILVERWARE 

GIFTS AND CLOCKS 

Fine Repairing a Specialty 

28 Main St., Plymouth, Mass. 

All work done in our own shop. 



66 



THE PILGRIM 



FOR THC SUCCESSFUL 



PRODUCTION OF YEAR BOOKS 



BICKFORD 




MANY YEARS OF PLATE MAKING FOR SATISFIED COLLEGES AND 
HIGH SCHOOLS COVERING NEW ENGLAND 




CONFERENCES ARRANGED BETWEEN EDITORIAL 
BOARDS AND THE HEADS OF OUR DEPARTMENTS 



' BICKFORD 

ENGRAVING AND ELECTROTYPE CO. 



ZO MATMEWSON ST. 



PROVIDENCE, R.I. 



Make your next automobile investment the 
soundest money can buy 



A New 



FORD V-S 



Pay for it through the 

UNIVERSAL CREDIT COMPANY 

at the rate of 

/W & MONTH 

(after usual, low down payment .... your PRESENT car will 
probably cover that) 

We are offering this finance plan, as well as other plans figured at the rate 

of l / 2 of 1% (6% for 12 months) on the original unpaid 

balance and insurance. 

Get complete details and a ride in a New Ford V-8 by calling 

PLYMOUTH MOTOR SALES 

Authorized Ford Sales and Service 
181 COURT ST. Tel. 1247-W PLYMOUTH 



THE PILGRIM 



67 



Does Your Boy Drink Milk? 



NOOK FAR 
DAIRY 

IS 
MY 

ILKMAN" 







'w^f 



7i*t» 



N2 



I'm only 8 years old and am one of the healthiest 
boys in my class. That's why I am thankful to NOOK 
FARM DAIRY. My mother says that Nook Farm 
Products are always fresh and always best." 



Nook Farm Dairy 



'COUNTRY FRESH" 



T. FRED GREGSON, Mgr. 



NOOK ROAD 



Tel 1261 



PLYMOUTH 



68 



THE PILGRIM 



Plymouth Co-operative Bank 

Chartered 1882 
A. PERRY RICHARDS, President ROBERT J. TUBBS, Treasurer 




Here's 

Higher Pay for your 

WORKING DOLLARS 

This time honored Plymouth institution has served your parents and an- 
cestors for over half a century. Many of them, through our plan of System- 
atic saving, have accumulated the funds which will enable you to go to higher 
institutions of learning, or, through our pay-like-rent plans of home owner- 
ship, have purchased the homes in which you live. 

In our desire to serve you and yours in a like capacity, may we give you 
this advice. If you go to work for someone, put a few dollars out to 
work for you — and live at a profit in the years to come. 

We have a plan to suit your purse and your purpose. 

You'll put more money to work by our plan of systematic saving than by 
any hit-or-miss method. 



PLYMOUTH CO-OPERATIVE BANK 



44 Main Street 



Plymouth, Mass. 



Tel. 236 



Member of Federal Home Loan Bank System 



PRINTING SERVICE 

Let your printing and advertising be so well prepared and printed 
that it will be in keeping with the quality and service you are equipped 
to give your customers. 

There is a dependable permanence about GOOD PRINTING which 
awakens and maintains favor for any good business. 

Our thought in producing printing centers on your interests. 



The ROGERS PRINT 

"Complete Printing Service" 
20 Middle Street Plymouth, Mass. 



BAILEY MOTOR SALES, INC. 



j 114 Sandwich Street 



Tel. 1090 

Buick and Pontiac Sales and Service 

G.M.C. Truck Sales and Service 

A reliable place to trade 

One of the best equipped Service Stations in this vicinity 

24-hour service: open day and night 

Agents for Exide Batteries and General Tires 

Don't forget — all of our repair work is guaranteed 

A fine selection of Used Cars and Trucks to choose from at all times 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



i 



Northeastern 
University 




c 

I 

I 

! 
! 

I 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

J Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a founda- 

tion for the understanding of modern culture, social relations, and 
technical achievement. The purpose of this program is to give the 
student a liberal and cultural education and a vocational competence 
which fits him to enter some specific type of useful employment. 

J COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

I Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the 

principles of business with specialization in ACCOUNTING, 

i BANKING AND FINANCE, or BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. 

Modern methods of instruction, including lectures, solution of busi- 
ness problems, class discussions, professional talks by business ex- j 

| ecutives, and motion pictures of manufacturing processes, are used. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING ) 

Provides complete college programs in Engineering with pro- 
fessional courses in the fields of CIVIL, MECHANICAL (WITH 
DIESEL, AERONAUTICAL and AIR CONDITIONING OPTIONS), 
ELECTRICAL, CHEMICAL, INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING, and 
| ENGINEERING ADMINISTRATION. General engineering courses 

are pursued during the freshman year; thus the student need not 
make a final decision as to the branch of engineering in which he 
wishes to specialize until the beginning of the sophomore year. 



CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 

The Co-operative Plan, which is available to upperclassmen in all 
courses, provides for a combination of practical industrial experi- 
ence with classroom instruction. Under this plan the student is able 
to earn a portion of his school expenses as well as to make business 
contacts which prove valuable in later years. 

DEGREES AWARDED 

Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Science 

For catalog or further information write to: 
MILTON J. SCHLAGENHAUF, Director of Admissions 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS